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Acts 19:37

    Acts 19:37 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For ye have brought hither these men, which are neither robbers of churches, nor yet blasphemers of your goddess.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For you have brought here these men, which are neither robbers of churches, nor yet blasphemers of your goddess.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For ye have brought hither these men, who are neither robbers of temples nor blasphemers of our goddess.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For you have taken these men, who are not doing damage to the holy place or talking against our goddess.

    Webster's Revision

    For ye have brought hither these men, who are neither robbers of temples nor blasphemers of our goddess.

    World English Bible

    For you have brought these men here, who are neither robbers of temples nor blasphemers of your goddess.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For ye have brought hither these men, which are neither robbers of temples nor blasphemers of our goddess.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 19:37

    These men - are neither robbers of churches - Ἱρεσυλους; Spoilers of sacred places. As his design evidently was to appease and conciliate the people, he fixed first on a most incontrovertible fact: These men have not spoiled your temples; nor is there any evidence that they have even blasphemed your goddess. The apostles acted as prudent men should: they endeavored to enlighten the minds of the multitude, that the absurdity of their gross errors might be the more apparent; for, when they should know the truth, it was likely that they would at once abandon such gross falsehood.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 19:37

    For ye ... - Demetrius and his friends. The blame was to be traced to them.

    Which are neither robbers of churches - The word "churches" we now apply to edifices reared for purposes of Christian worship. Since no such churches had then been built, this translation is unhappy, and is not at all demanded by the original. The Greek word ἱεροσύλους hierosulous is applied properly to those who commit sacrilege; who plunder temples of their sacred things. The meaning here is that Paul and his companions had not been guilty of robbing the temple of Diana, or any other temple. The charge of sacrilege could not be brought against them. Though they had preached against idols and idol worship, yet they had offered no violence to the temples of idolaters, nor had they attempted to strip them of the sacred utensils employed in their service. What they had done, they had done peaceably.

    Nor yet blasphemers of your goddess - They had not used harsh or reproachful language of Diana. This had not been charged on them, nor is there the least evidence that they had done it. They had opposed idolatry; had reasoned against it; and had endeavored to turn the people from it. But there is not the least evidence that they had ever done it in harsh or reproachful language. This shows that people should employ reason, and not harsh or reproachful language against a pervading evil; and that the way to remove it is to enlighten the minds of people, and to convince them of the error of their ways. People gain nothing by bitter and reviling words; and it is much to obtain the testimony of even the enemies of religion as Paul did of the chancellor of Ephesus - that no such words had been used in describing their crimes and follies.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 19:37

    19:37 Nor blasphemers of your goddess - They simply declared the one God, and the vanity of idols in general.