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Acts 19:40

    Acts 19:40 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For we are in danger to be called in question for this day's uproar, there being no cause whereby we may give an account of this concourse.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For we are in danger to be called in question for this day's uproar, there being no cause whereby we may give an account of this concourse.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For indeed we are in danger to be accused concerning this day's riot, there being no cause for it : and as touching it we shall not be able to give account of this concourse.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For, truly, we are in danger of being made responsible for this day's trouble, there being no cause for it: and we are not able to give any reason for this coming together.

    Webster's Revision

    For indeed we are in danger to be accused concerning this day's riot, there being no cause for it : and as touching it we shall not be able to give account of this concourse.

    World English Bible

    For indeed we are in danger of being accused concerning this day's riot, there being no cause. Concerning it, we wouldn't be able to give an account of this commotion."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For indeed we are in danger to be accused concerning this day's riot, there being no cause for it: and as touching it we shall not be able to give account of this concourse.

    Definitions for Acts 19:40

    Concourse - A gathering; a crowd of people.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 19:40

    For we are in danger, etc. - Popular commotions were always dreaded by the Roman government; and so they should by all governments; for, when might has nothing to direct its operations but passion, how destructive must these operations be! One of the Roman laws made all such commotions of the people capital offenses against those who raised them. Qui caetum et concursus fecerit, capite puniatur: "He who raises a mob shall forfeit his life." If such a law existed at Ephesus - and it probably did, from this reference to it in the words of the town-clerk or recorder - then Demetrius must feel himself in great personal danger; and that his own life lay now at the mercy of those whom he had accused, concerning whom he had raised such an outcry, and against whom nothing disorderly could be proved.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 19:40

    To be called in question - By the government; by the Roman authority. Such a tumult, continued for so long. a time, would be likely to attract the attention of the magistrates, and expose them to their displeasure. Popular commotions were justly dreaded by the Roman government; and such an assembly as this, convened without any good cause, would not escape their notice. There was a Roman law which made it capital for anyone to be engaged in promoting a riot. Sui coetum, et concursum fecerit, capite puniatur: "He who raises a mob, let him be punished with death."

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 19:40

    19:40 This concourse - He wisely calls it by an inoffensive name.