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Acts 2:15

    Acts 2:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    For these are not drunken, as ye suppose, seeing it is but the third hour of the day.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    For these are not drunken, as you suppose, seeing it is but the third hour of the day.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For these are not drunken, as ye suppose; seeing it is but the third hour of the day.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For these men are not overcome with wine, as it seems to you, for it is only the third hour of the day;

    Webster's Revision

    For these are not drunken, as ye suppose; seeing it is but the third hour of the day.

    World English Bible

    For these aren't drunken, as you suppose, seeing it is only the third hour of the day.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For these are not drunken, as ye suppose; seeing it is but the third hour of the day;

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 2:15

    But the third hour of the day - That is, about nine o'clock in the morning, previously to which the Jews scarcely ever ate or drank, for that hour was the hour of prayer. This custom appears to have been so common that even the most intemperate among the Jews were not known to transgress it; Peter therefore spoke with confidence when he said, these are not drunken - seeing it is but the third hour of the day, previously to which even the intemperate did not use wine.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 2:15

    For these are not drunken ... - The word these here includes Peter himself, as well as the others. The charge doubtless extended to all.

    The third hour of the day - The Jews divided their day into twelve equal parts, reckoning from sunrise to sunset. Of course the hours were longer in summer than in winter. The third hour would correspond to our nine o'clock in the morning. The reasons why it was so improbable that they would be drunk at that time were the following:

    (1) It was the hour of morning worship, or sacrifice. It was highly improbable that, at an hour usually devoted to public worship, they would be intoxicated.

    (2) it was not usual for even drunkards to become drunk in the daytime, 1 Thessalonians 5:7, "They that be drunken are drunken in the night."

    (3) the charge was, that they had become drunk with wine. Ardent spirits, or alcohol, that curse of our times, was unknown. It was very improbable that so much of the weak wine commonly used in Judea should have been taken at that early hour as to produce intoxication.

    (4) it was a regular practice with the Jews not to eat or drink anything until after the third hour of the day, especially on the Sabbath, and on all festival occasions. Sometimes this abstinence was maintained until noon. So universal was this custom, that the apostle could appeal to it with confidence, as a full refutation of the charge of drunkenness at that hour. Even the intemperate were not accustomed to drink before that hour. The following testimonies on this subject from Jewish writers are from Lightfoot: "This was the custom of pious people in ancient times, that each one should offer his morning prayers with additions in the synagogue, and then return home and take refreshment" (Maimonides, Shabb., chapter 30). "They remained in the synagogue until the sixth hour and a half, and then each one offered the prayer of the Minchah before he returned home, and then he ate." "The fourth is the hour of repast, when all eat." One of the Jewish writers says that the difference between thieves and honest men might be known by the fact that the former might be seen in the morning at the fourth hour eating and sleeping, and holding a cup in his hand. But for those who made pretensions to religion, as the apostles did, such a thing was altogether improbable.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 2:15

    2:15 It is but the third hour of the day - That is, nine in the morning. And on the solemn festivals the Jews rarely ate or drank any thing till noon.