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Acts 20:34

    Acts 20:34 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yea, ye yourselves know, that these hands have ministered unto my necessities, and to them that were with me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yes, you yourselves know, that these hands have ministered to my necessities, and to them that were with me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Ye yourselves know that these hands ministered unto my necessities, and to them that were with me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    You yourselves have seen that with these hands I got what was necessary for me and those who were with me.

    Webster's Revision

    Ye yourselves know that these hands ministered unto my necessities, and to them that were with me.

    World English Bible

    You yourselves know that these hands served my necessities, and those who were with me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Ye yourselves know that these hands ministered unto my necessities, and to them that were with me.

    Definitions for Acts 20:34

    Yea - Yes; certainly.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 20:34

    These hands have ministered, etc. - It was neither "sin nor discredit" for the apostle to work to maintain himself, when the circumstances of the Church were such that it could not support him. Still many eminent ministers of God are obliged to support themselves and their families, at least in part, in the same way, while indefatigably testifying the Gospel of the grace of God. Whatever it may be to the people, it is no cause of reproach to the minister, to be obliged thus to employ himself.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 20:34

    Yea, ye yourselves know - By your own acquaintance with my manner of life. In Corinth he had lived and labored with Apollos (note, Acts 18:3); and he refers elsewhere to the fact that he had supported himself, in part at least, by his own labor, 1 Corinthians 4:12; 1 Thessalonians 2:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:8. We may hence learn that it is no discredit to a minister to labor. Whatever it may be to a people who put him under a necessity to toil for his support, yet the example of Paul shows that a man should rejoice in the privilege of preaching the gospel, even if it is done while he is obliged to resort to labor for his daily bread. It is well when a minister of the gospel can make an appeal to his people like this of Paul, and say, "I have coveted no man's gold, or silver, or apparel." Every minister should so live that he can make this appeal to their own consciences of the sincerity and disinterestedness of his labors from the pulpit; or when called to separate from them as Paul did; or when on a dying bed. Every minister of the gospel, when be comes to lie down to die, will desire to be able to make this appeal, and to leave a solemn testimony there, that it was not for gold, or ease, or fame, that he toiled in the ministerial office. How much more influence will such a man have than he who has been worldly-minded; he who has sought to become rich; and he, the only memorials of whose life is, that he has sought "the fleece, not the flock" - that he has gained the property, not the souls of people.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 20:34

    20:34 These hands - Callous, as you see, with labour. Who is he that envies such a bishop or archbishop as this?