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Acts 20:38

    Acts 20:38 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Sorrowing most of all for the words which he spake, that they should see his face no more. And they accompanied him unto the ship.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Sorrowing most of all for the words which he spoke, that they should see his face no more. And they accompanied him to the ship.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    sorrowing most of all for the word which he had spoken, that they should behold his face no more. And they brought him on his way unto the ship.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Being sad most of all because he had said that they would not see his face again. And so they went with him to the ship.

    Webster's Revision

    sorrowing most of all for the word which he had spoken, that they should behold his face no more. And they brought him on his way unto the ship.

    World English Bible

    sorrowing most of all because of the word which he had spoken, that they should see his face no more. And they accompanied him to the ship.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Sorrowing most of all for the word which he had spoken, that they should behold his face no more. And they brought him on his way unto the ship.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 20:38

    That they should see his face no more - This was a most solemn meeting, and a most affecting parting. The man who had first pointed out to them the Lord Jesus Christ, by whom they had been brought into so glorious a state of salvation, is now going away, in all likelihood, to be seen no more till the day in which the quick and dead shall stand before the throne of judgment. Such a scene, and its correspondent feelings, are more easily imagined than described.

    1. As the disciples are stated to have come together on the first day of the week, we may learn from this that, ever since the apostolic times, the Lord's day, now the Christian Sabbath, was set apart for religious exercises; such as the preaching of God's holy word, and celebrating the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. Besides its being the day on which our blessed Lord rose from the dead, the practice of the apostles and the primitive Church is an additional reason why we should religiously celebrate this first day of the week. They who, professing the Christian religion, still prefer the Jewish Sabbath, have little to support them in the New Testament. How prone is man to affect to be wise above what is written, while he is, in almost every respect, below the teaching so plainly laid down in the Divine word.

    2. The charge of St. Paul to the pastors of the Church of Christ at Ephesus and Miletus contains much that is interesting to every Christian minister:

    1. If he be sent of God at all, he is sent to feed the flock.

    2. But, in order to feed them, he must have the bread of life.

    3. This bread he must distribute in its due season, that each may have that portion that is suitable to time, place, and state.

    4. While he is feeding others, he should take care to have his own soul fed: it is possible for a minister to be the instrument of feeding others, and yet starve himself.

    5. If Jesus Christ intrust to his care the souls he has bought by his own blood, what an awful account will he have to give in the day of judgment, if any of them perish through his neglect! Though the sinner, dying in his sins, has his own blood upon his head, yet, if the watchman has not faithfully warned him, his blood will be required at the watchman's hand. Let him who is concerned read Ezekiel, Ezekiel 33:3-5, and think of the account which he is shortly to give unto God.

    3. Tenderness and sympathy are not inconsistent with the highest state of grace. Paul warns his hearers day and night with tears. His hearers now weep sore at the departure of their beloved pastor. They who can give up a Christian minister with indifference, have either profited little under that ministry, or they have backslidden from the grace of God. The pastors should love as fathers, the converts as children; and all feel themselves one family, under that great head, Christ Jesus.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 20:38

    Sorrowing most of all ... - This was a most tender and affectionate parting scene. It can be more easily imagined than described. We may learn from it:

    (1) That the parting of ministers and people is a most solemn event, and should be one of much tenderness and affection.

    (2) the effect of true religion is to make the heart more tender; to make friendship more affectionate and sacred; and to unite more closely the bonds of love.

    (3) ministers of the gospel should be prepared to leave their people with the same consciousness of fidelity and the same kindness and love which Paul evinced. They should live such lives as to be able to look back upon their whole ministry as pure and disinterested, and as having been employed in guarding the flock, and in making known to them the whole counsel of God. So parting, they may separate in peace; and so living and acting, they will be prepared to give up their account with joy, and not with grief. May God grant to every minister the spirit which Paul evinced at Ephesus, and enable each one, when called to leave his people by death or otherwise, to do it with the same consciousness of fidelity which Paul evinced when he left his people to see their face no more.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 20:38

    20:38 Sorrowing most for that word which he spake, that they should see his face no more - What sorrow will be in the great day, when God shall speak that word to all who are found on the left hand, that they shall see his face no more!