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Acts 21:1

    Acts 21:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And it came to pass, that after we were gotten from them, and had launched, we came with a straight course unto Coos, and the day following unto Rhodes, and from thence unto Patara:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And it came to pass, that after we were gotten from them, and had launched, we came with a straight course to Coos, and the day following to Rhodes, and from there to Patara:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And when it came to pass that were parted from them and had set sail, we came with a straight course unto Cos, and the next day unto Rhodes, and from thence unto Patara:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And after parting from them, we put out to sea and came straight to Cos, and the day after to Rhodes, and from there to Patara:

    Webster's Revision

    And when it came to pass that were parted from them and had set sail, we came with a straight course unto Cos, and the next day unto Rhodes, and from thence unto Patara:

    World English Bible

    When it happened that we had parted from them and had set sail, we came with a straight course to Cos, and the next day to Rhodes, and from there to Patara.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And when it came to pass that we were parted from them, and had set sail, we came with a straight course unto Cos, and the next day unto Rhodes, and from thence unto Patara:

    Definitions for Acts 21:1

    Thence - There; that place.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 21:1

    Came with a straight course - Having had, as is necessarily implied, wind and tide in their favor.

    Coos - An island in the Archipelago, or Aegean Sea, one of those called the Sporades. It was famous for the worship of Aesculapius and Juno; and for being the birthplace of Hippocrates, the most eminent of physicians, and Apelles, the most celebrated of painters.

    Rhodes - Another island in the same sea, celebrated for its Colossus, which was one of the seven wonders of the world. This was a brazen statue of Apollo, so high that ships in full sail could pass between its legs. It was the work of Chares, a pupil of Lysippus, who spent twelve years in making it. It was 106 feet high, and so great that few people could fathom its thumb. It was thrown down by an earthquake about 224 years before Christ, after having stood sixty-six years. When the Saracens took possession of this island, they sold this prostrate image to a Jew, who loaded 900 camels with the brass of it; this was about a.d. 660, nearly 900 years after it had been thrown down.

    Patara - One of the chief seaport towns of Syria.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 21:1

    After we were gotten from them - After we had left the elders at Miletus, Acts 20:38. They were on their way to Jerusalem.

    Unto Coos - This was a small island in the Grecian Archipelago, a short distance from the southwestern point of Asia Minor. It is now called "Stan-co." It was celebrated for its fertility, and for the wine and silk-worms which it produced. It was about 40 miles south of Miletus.

    Unto Rhodes - This was also an island in the Grecian Archipelago. On the island was a city of the same name, which was principally distinguished for its brass Colossus, which was built by Chares of Lyndus. It stood across the mouth of the harbor, and was so high that vessels could pass between its legs. It stood for 56 years, and was then thrown down by an earthquake. It was reckoned as one of the seven wonders of the world. When the Saracens took possession of this island they sold this prostrate image to a Jew, who loaded 900 camels with the brass from it. This was 600 a.d., about 900 years after it had been thrown down. The ancient name of the island was Asteria. Its name, Rhodes, was given from the great quantity of roses which it produced.

    Unto Patara - This was a maritime city of Lycia, in Asia Minor, over against Rhodes.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 21:1

    21:1 And when we were torn away from the in - Not without doing violence both to ourselves and them.