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Acts 21:29

    Acts 21:29 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    (For they had seen before with him in the city Trophimus an Ephesian, whom they supposed that Paul had brought into the temple.)

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    (For they had seen before with him in the city Trophimus an Ephesian, whom they supposed that Paul had brought into the temple.)

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    For they had before seen with him in the city Trophimus the Ephesian, whom they supposed that Paul had brought into the temple.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For they had seen him before in the town with Trophimus of Ephesus, and had the idea that Paul had taken him with him into the Temple.

    Webster's Revision

    For they had before seen with him in the city Trophimus the Ephesian, whom they supposed that Paul had brought into the temple.

    World English Bible

    For they had seen Trophimus, the Ephesian, with him in the city, and they supposed that Paul had brought him into the temple.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    For they had before seen with him in the city Trophimus the Ephesian, whom they supposed that Paul had brought into the temple.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 21:29

    In the city - In Jerusalem. As he was with Paul, it was inferred that he would attend him everywhere.

    Trophimus - He had accompanied Paul on his way from Ephesus, Acts 20:4.

    Whom they supposed ... - This is a most striking illustration of the manner in which accusations are often brought against others. They had seen him with Paul in the city; they inferred, therefore, that he had been with him in the temple. They did not even pretend that they had seen him in the temple; but the inference was enough to inflame the angry and excitable passions of the multitude. So in the accusations which people now often make of others. They see one thing, they infer another; they could testify to one thing, but they conclude that another thing will also be true, and that other thing they charge on them as the truth. If people would state facts as they are, no small part of the slanderous accusations against others would cease. An end would be made of the most of the charges of falsehood, error, heresy, dishonesty, double-dealing, and immorality. If a statement is made, it should be of the thing as it was. If we attempt to say what a man has done, it should not be what we suppose he has done. If we attempt to state what he believes, it should not be what we suppose he believes.