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Acts 21:7

    Acts 21:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And when we had finished our course from Tyre, we came to Ptolemais, and saluted the brethren, and abode with them one day.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And when we had finished our course from Tyre, we came to Ptolemais, and saluted the brothers, and stayed with them one day.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And when we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolemais; and we saluted the brethren, and abode with them one day.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And journeying by ship from Tyre we came to Ptolemais; and there we had talk with the brothers and were with them for one day.

    Webster's Revision

    And when we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolemais; and we saluted the brethren, and abode with them one day.

    World English Bible

    When we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolemais. We greeted the brothers, and stayed with them one day.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And when we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolemais; and we saluted the brethren, and abode with them one day.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 21:7

    We came to Ptolemais - This was a seaport town of Galilee, not far from Mount Carmel, between Tyre and Caesarea, where the river Belus empties itself into the sea. It was at first called Accho, (and this is the reading of the Syriac and Arabic), and belonged to the tribe of Asher, Judges 1:31; it was enlarged and beautified by the first of the Egyptian Ptolemies, from whom it was called Ptolemais. This place terminated St. Paul's voyage; and this is what is expressed in the text: And we came from Tyre to Ptolemais, where our voyage ended. See the Greek text.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 21:7

    We came to Ptolemais - This was a city situated on the coast of the Mediterranean, on the north angle of a bay which extends, in a semicircle of three leagues, as far as the point of Mount Carmel. At the south and west sides the city was washed by the sea, and was surrounded by triple walls. It was in the tribe of Asher Judges 1:31, and was originally called Accho; but was called Ptolemais in honor of one of the Ptolemies, who beautified and adorned it. The Christian crusaders gave it the name of Acre, or John of Acre, from a magnificent church which was built in it, and which was dedicated to the apostle John. It is still called Akha by the Turks. The Syriac and Arabic render it Accho in this place. It sustained several sieges during the Crusades, and was the last fortified place wrested from the Christians by the Turks. It sustained a memorable siege under Bonaparte, and since then it has been much increased and strengthened. Its present population is estimated at from 18,000 to 20,000.

    And saluted the brethren - Embraced them; gave them expressions of affection and regard.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 21:7

    21:7 Having finished our voyage - From Macedonia, Acts 20:6, we came to Ptolemais - A celebrated city on the sea coast, anciently called Accos. It is now, like many other once noble cities, only a heap of ruins.