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Acts 24:8

    Acts 24:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Commanding his accusers to come unto thee: by examining of whom thyself mayest take knowledge of all these things, whereof we accuse him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Commanding his accusers to come to you: by examining of whom yourself may take knowledge of all these things, whereof we accuse him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    commanding his accusers to come before thee. from whom thou wilt be able, by examining him thyself, to take knowledge of all these things whereof we accuse him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And from whom you will be able, by questioning him yourself, to get knowledge of all the things which we say against him.

    Webster's Revision

    commanding his accusers to come before thee. from whom thou wilt be able, by examining him thyself, to take knowledge of all these things whereof we accuse him.

    World English Bible

    By examining him yourself you may ascertain all these things of which we accuse him."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    from whom thou wilt be able, by examining him thyself, to take knowledge of all these things, whereof we accuse him.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 24:8

    Commanding his accusers to come, etc. - Here Tertullus closes his opening and statement of the case; and now he proceeds to call and examine his witnesses; and they were no doubt examined one by one, though St. Luke sums the whole up in one word - The Jews also assented, saying, that these things were so. Whoever considers the plan of Tertullus's speech, will perceive that it was both judicious and artful. Let us take a view of the whole: -

    1. He praises Felix to conciliate his favor.

    2. He generally states the great blessings of his administration.

    3. He states that the Jews, throughout the whole land, felt themselves under the greatest obligations to him, and extolled his prudent and beneficent management of the public affairs every where.

    4. That the prisoner before him was a very bad man; a disturber of the public peace; a demagogue of a dangerous party; and so lost to all sense of religion as to attempt to profane the temple!

    5. That, though he should have been punished on the spot, yet, as they were ordered by the chief captain to appear before him, and show the reason why they had seized on Paul at Jerusalem, they were accordingly come; and, having now exhibited their charges, he would,

    6. proceed to examine witnesses, who would prove all these things to the satisfaction of the governor.

    7. He then called his witnesses, and their testimony confirmed and substantiated the charges. No bad cause was ever more judiciously and cunningly managed.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 24:8

    Commanding his accusers ... - Acts 23:30.

    By examining of whom - That is, the Jews who were then present. Tertullus offered them as his witnesses of the truth of what he had said. It is evident that we have here only the summary or outline of the speech which he made It is incredible that a Roman rhetorician would have on such an occasion delivered an address so brief, so meagre, and so destitute of display as this. But it is doubtless a correct summary of his address, and contains the leading points of the accusation. It is customary for the sacred writers, as for other writers, to give only the outline of discourses and arguments. Such a course was inevitable, unless the New Testament had been swelled to wholly undue proportions.