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Acts 25:22

    Acts 25:22 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then Agrippa said unto Festus, I would also hear the man myself. To morrow, said he, thou shalt hear him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then Agrippa said to Festus, I would also hear the man myself. To morrow, said he, you shall hear him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Agrippa'said unto Festus, I also could wish to hear the man myself. To-morrow, saith he, thou shalt hear him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Agrippa said to Festus, I have a desire to give the man a hearing myself. Tomorrow, he said, you may give him a hearing.

    Webster's Revision

    And Agrippa'said unto Festus, I also could wish to hear the man myself. To-morrow, saith he, thou shalt hear him.

    World English Bible

    Agrippa said to Festus, "I also would like to hear the man myself." "Tomorrow," he said, "you shall hear him."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Agrippa said unto Festus, I also could wish to hear the man myself. Tomorrow, saith he, thou shalt hear him.

    Definitions for Acts 25:22

    Morrow - Next day; tomorrow.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 25:22

    I would also hear the man myself - A spirit of curiosity, similar to that of Herod, Luke 23:8.

    As Herod, the father of this Agrippa, had been so active an instrument in endeavoring to destroy Christianity, having killed James, and was about to have put Peter to death also, had not God sent him to his own place, there is no doubt that Agrippa had heard much about Christianity; and as to St. Paul, his conversion was so very remarkable that his name, in connection with Christianity, was known, not only throughout Judea, but through all Asia Minor and Greece. Agrippa, therefore might naturally wish to see and hear a man of whom he had heard so much.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 25:22

    Then Agrippa said ... - Agrippa doubtless had heard much of the fame of Jesus, and of the new sect of Christians, and probably he was induced by mere curiosity to hear what Paul could say in explanation and defense of Christianity. This wish of Agrippa gave occasion to the noblest defense which was ever made before any tribunal, and to as splendid eloquence as can be found in any language. See Acts 26:23.