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Acts 26:27

    Acts 26:27 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    King Agrippa, believest thou the prophets? I know that thou believest.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    King Agrippa, believe you the prophets? I know that you believe.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    King Agrippa, believest thou the prophets? I know that thou believest.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    King Agrippa, have you faith in the prophets? I am certain that you have.

    Webster's Revision

    King Agrippa, believest thou the prophets? I know that thou believest.

    World English Bible

    King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know that you believe."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    King Agrippa, believest thou the prophets? I know that thou believest.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 26:27

    Believest thou the prophets? - Having made his elegant compliment and vindication to Festus, he turns to Agrippa; and, with this strong appeal to his religious feeling, says, Believest thou the prophets? and immediately anticipates his reply, and, with great address, speaks for him, I know that thou believest. The inference from this belief necessarily was: "As thou believest the prophets, and I have proved that the prophets have spoken about Christ, as suffering and, triumphing over death, and that all they say of the Messiah has been fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth, then thou must acknowledge that my doctrine is true."

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 26:27

    King Agrippa - This bold personal address is an instance of Paul's happy manner of appeal. He does it to bring in the testimony of Agrippa to meet the charge of Festus that he was deranged.

    Believest thou the prophets? - The prophecies respecting the character, the sufferings, and the death of the Messiah.

    I know that thou believest - Agrippa was a Jew; and, as such, he of course believed the prophets. Perhaps, too, from what Paul knew of his personal character, he might confidently affirm that he professed to be a believer. Instead, therefore, of waiting for his answer, Paul anticipated it, and said that he knew that Agrippa professed to believe all these prophecies respecting the Messiah. His design is evident. It is:

    (1) To meet the charge of derangement, and to bring in the testimony of Agrippa, who well understood the subject, to the importance and the truth of what he was saying.

    (2) to press on the conscience of his royal hearer the evidence of the Christian religion, and to secure, if possible, his conversion. "Since thou believest the prophecies, and since I have shown that they are fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth; that he corresponds in person, character, and work, with the prophets, it follows that his religion is true." Paul lost no opportunity in pressing the truth on every class of people. He had such a conviction of the truth of Christianity that he was deterred by no rank, station, or office; by no fear of the rich, the great, and the learned; but everywhere urged the evidence of that religion as indisputable. In this lay the secret of no small part of his success. A man who really believes the truth will be ready to defend it. A man who truly loves religion will not be ashamed of it anywhere.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 26:27

    26:27 King Agrippa, believest thou the prophets? - He that believes these, believes Paul, yea, and Christ. The apostle now comes close to his heart. What did Agrippa feel when he heard this? I know that thou believest! - Here Paul lays so fast hold on the king that he can scarce make any resistance.