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Acts 28:12

    Acts 28:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And landing at Syracuse, we tarried there three days.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And landing at Syracuse, we tarried there three days.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And touching at Syracuse, we tarried there three days.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And going into the harbour at Syracuse, we were waiting there for three days.

    Webster's Revision

    And touching at Syracuse, we tarried there three days.

    World English Bible

    Touching at Syracuse, we stayed there three days.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And touching at Syracuse, we tarried there three days.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 28:12

    Landing at Syracuse - In order to go to Rome from Malta, their readiest course was to keep pretty close to the eastern coast of Sicily, in order to pass through the straits of Rhegium and get into the Tyrrhenian Sea.

    Syracuse is one of the most famous cities of antiquity: it is the capital of the island of Sicily, and was built about 730 years before the Christian era. It lies 72 miles S. by E. of Messina, and about 112 of Palermo. Long. 15. 30'. W., lat. 37. 17'. N. In its ancient state, it was about 22 English miles in circumference; and was highly celebrated for the martial spirit of its inhabitants. This was the birthplace of the illustrious Archimedes; who, when the city was besieged by the Romans, under Marcellus, about 212 years before Christ, defended the place with his powerful engines against all the valor and power of the assailants. He beat their galleys to pieces by huge stones projected from his machines; and by hooks, chains, and levers, from the walls, weighed the ships out of the water, and, whirling them round, dashed them in pieces against each other, or sunk them to the bottom: several also, he is said to have destroyed by his burning glasses. When the city was taken by treachery, Archimedes was found intensely engaged in the demonstration of a problem. A Roman soldier coming up, and presenting his dagger to his throat, he cried, "Stop, soldier, or thou wilt spoil my diagram!" The brute was unmoved, and murdered him on the spot.

    This city was almost totally destroyed by an earthquake in 1693: its present population amounts to but about 18,000. Christianity, in some form or other, has existed here ever since St. Paul spent the three days in it, mentioned in the text.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 28:12

    And landing at Syracuse - Syracuse was the capital of the island of Sicily, on the eastern coast. It was in the direct course from Malta to Rome. It contains about 18,000 inhabitants.