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Acts 8:34

    Acts 8:34 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the eunuch answered Philip, and said, I pray thee, of whom speaketh the prophet this? of himself, or of some other man?

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the eunuch answered Philip, and said, I pray you, of whom speaks the prophet this? of himself, or of some other man?

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the eunuch answered Philip, and said, I pray thee, of whom speaketh the prophet this? of himself, or of some other?

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the Ethiopian said to Philip, About whom are these words said by the prophet? about himself, or some other?

    Webster's Revision

    And the eunuch answered Philip, and said, I pray thee, of whom speaketh the prophet this? of himself, or of some other?

    World English Bible

    The eunuch answered Philip, "Who is the prophet talking about? About himself, or about someone else?"

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the eunuch answered Philip, and said, I pray thee, of whom speaketh the prophet this? of himself, or of some other?

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 8:34

    Of whom speaketh the prophet this - This was a very natural inquiry: for in the test itself, and in its circumstances, there was nothing that could determine the meaning, so as to ascertain whether the prophet meant himself or some other person; and the very inquiry shows that the eunuch had thought deeply on the subject.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 8:34

    Answered Philip - That is, "addressed" Phil The Hebrews often use the word "answer" as synonymous with "addressing" one, whether he had spoken or not.

    Of himself ... - This was a natural inquiry, for there was nothing in the text itself that would determine to whom the reference was. The ancient Jews expressly applied the passage to the Messiah. Thus, the Targum of Jonathan on Isaiah 52:13, "Behold my servant shall deal prudently," etc., renders it, "Behold, my servant, the Messiah, shall be prospered," etc. But we should remember that the eunuch was probably not deeply versed in the Scriptures. We should remember, further, that he had just been at Jerusalem, and that the public mind was agitated about the proceedings of the Sanhedrin in putting Jesus of Nazareth, who claimed to be the Messiah, to death. It is by no means improbable that This passage had been urged as a proof that he was the Messiah; and that the Jews, to evade the force of it, had maintained that it referred to Isaiah or Jeremiah - as they have done since. Yet the subject was so important and so difficult that it had occupied the attention of the traveler during his journey; and his question shows that he had been deeply pondering the inquiry whether it could refer to Isaiah himself or any of the prophets, or whether it must have reference to the Messiah. In this state of suspense and agitation, when his mind was just suited to receive instruction, God sent a messenger to guide him. He often thus prepares, by His Providence, or by a train of affecting and solemn events, the minds of people for a reception of the truth; and then He sends his messengers to guide the thoughtful and the anxious in the way of peace and salvation.