Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Acts 9:25

    Acts 9:25 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then the disciples took him by night, and let him down by the wall in a basket.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then the disciples took him by night, and let him down by the wall in a basket.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    but his disciples took him by night, and let him down through the wall, lowering him in a basket.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But his disciples took him by night and let him down from the wall in a basket.

    Webster's Revision

    but his disciples took him by night, and let him down through the wall, lowering him in a basket.

    World English Bible

    but his disciples took him by night, and let him down through the wall, lowering him in a basket.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    but his disciples took him by night, and let him down through the wall, lowering him in a basket.

    Definitions for Acts 9:25

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 9:25

    Let him down, by the wall - Favoured, probably, by a house built against or upon the wall, through the window of which they could lower him in a basket; and by this means he made his escape. His escape was something similar to that of the spies at Jericho, Joshua 2:15.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 9:25

    Took him by night ... - This was done through a window in the wall, 2 Corinthians 11:33.

    In a basket - This word is used to denote commonly "the basket in which food was carried," Matthew 15:37; Mark 8:8, Mark 8:20. It was in this way that Rahab let down the spies Joshua 2:15, and so David escaped from Saul, 1 Samuel 19:12. Probably this occurred in an unguarded part of the wall, where some overhanging houses, as is usual in Eastern cities, opened into the outer country. This conduct of Saul was in accordance with the direction of the Lord Jesus Matthew 10:23, "When they persecute you in one city, flee ye into another," etc. Saul was certain of death if he remained; and as he could secure his life by flight without abandoning any principle of religion, or denying his Lord, it was his duty to do so. Christianity requires us to sacrifice our lives only when we cannot avoid it without denying the Saviour, or abandoning the principles of our religion.