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Acts 9:9

    Acts 9:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And he was three days without sight, and neither did eat nor drink.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And he was three days without sight, and neither did eat nor drink.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And he was three days without sight, and did neither eat nor drink.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And for three days he was not able to see, and he took no food or drink.

    Webster's Revision

    And he was three days without sight, and did neither eat nor drink.

    World English Bible

    He was without sight for three days, and neither ate nor drank.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And he was three days without sight, and did neither eat nor drink.

    Definitions for Acts 9:9

    Without - Outside.

    Clarke's Commentary on Acts 9:9

    Neither did eat nor drink - The anxiety of his mind and the anguish of his heart were so great that he had no appetite for food; and he continued in total darkness and without food for three days, till Ananias proclaimed salvation to him in the name of the Lord Jesus.

    Barnes' Notes on Acts 9:9

    And neither did eat nor drink - Probably because he was overwhelmed with a view of his sins, and was thus indisposed to eat. All the circumstances would contribute to this. His past life; his great sins; the sudden change in his views; his total absorption in the vision; perhaps also his grief at the loss of his sight, would all fill his mind, and indispose him to partake of food. Great grief always produces this effect. And it is not uncommon now for an awakened and convicted sinner, in view of his past sins and danger, to be so pained as to destroy his inclination for food, and to produce involuntary fasting. We are to remember also that Paul had yet no assurance of forgiveness. He was arrested, alarmed, convinced that Jesus was the Messiah, and humbled, but he had not found comfort. He was brought to the dust, and left to three painful days of darkness and suspense, before it was told him what he was to do. In this painful and perplexing state, it was natural that he should abstain from food. This case should not be brought now, however, to prove that convicted sinners must remain in darkness and under conviction. Sail's case was extraordinary. His blindness was literal. This state of darkness was necessary to humble him and fit him for his work. But the moment a sinner will give his heart to Christ, he may find peace. If he resists, and rebels longer, it will be his own fault. By the nature of the ease, as well as by the promises of the Bible, if a sinner will yield himself at once to the Lord Jesus, he will obtain peace. That sinners do not sooner obtain peace is because they do not sooner submit themselves to God.

    Wesley's Notes on Acts 9:9

    9:9 And he was three days - An important season! So long he seems to have been in the pangs of the new birth. Without sight - By scales growing over his eyes, to intimate to him the blindness of the state he had been in, to impress him with a deeper sense of the almighty power of Christ, and to turn his thoughts inward, while he was less capable of conversing with outward objects. This was likewise a manifest token to others, of what had happened to him in his journey, and ought to have humbled and convinced those bigoted Jews, to whom he had been sent from the sanhedrim.
    Book: Acts