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Amos 7:5

    Amos 7:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then said I, O Lord GOD, cease, I beseech thee: by whom shall Jacob arise? for he is small.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then said I, O Lord GOD, cease, I beseech you: by whom shall Jacob arise? for he is small.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Then said I, O Lord Jehovah, cease, I beseech thee: how shall Jacob stand? for he is small.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then said I, O Lord God, let there be an end: how will Jacob be able to keep his place? for he is small.

    Webster's Revision

    Then said I, O Lord Jehovah, cease, I beseech thee: how shall Jacob stand? for he is small.

    World English Bible

    Then I said, "Lord Yahweh, stop, I beg you! How could Jacob stand? For he is small."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Then said I, O Lord GOD, cease, I beseech thee: how shall Jacob stand? for he is small.

    Definitions for Amos 7:5

    Beseech - To call upon; appeal; beg.

    Barnes' Notes on Amos 7:5

    As our Lord repeated the same words in the Garden, so Amos interceded with God with words, all but one, the same, and with the same plea, that, if God did not help, Israel was indeed helpless. Yet a second time God spared Israel. To human sight, what so strange and unexpected, as that the Assyrian and his army, having utterly destroyed the kingdom of Damascus, and carried away its people, and having devoured, like fire, more than half of Israel, rolled back like an ebb-tide, swept away to ravage other countries, and spared the capital? And who, looking at the mere outside of things, would have thought that that tide of fire was rolled back, not by anything in that day, but by the prophet's prayer some 47 years before? Man would look doubtless for motives of human policy, which led Tiglath-pileser to accept tribute from Pekah, while he killed Rezin; and while he carried off all the Syrians of Damascus, to leave half of Israel to be removed by his successor.

    Humanly speaking, it was a mistake. He "scotched" his enemy only, and left him to make alliance with Egypt, his rival, who disputed with him the possession of the countries which lay between them. If we knew the details of Assyrian policy, we might know what induced him to turn aside in his conquest. There were, and always are, human motives. They do not interfere with the ground in the mind of God, who directs and controls them. Even in human contrivances, the wheels, interlacing one another, and acting one on the other, do but transmit, the one to the other, the motion and impulse which they have received from the central force. The revolution of the earth around its own center does not interfere with, rather it is a condition of its revolving round the center of our system, and, amidst the alternations of night and day, brings each several portion within the influence of the sun around which it revolves. The affairs of human kingdoms have their own subordinate centers of human policy, yet even thereby they the more revolve in the circuit of God's appointment. In the history of His former people God gives us a glimpse into a hidden order of things, the secret spring and power of His wisdom, which sets in motion that intricate and complex machinery which alone we see, and in the sight of which people lose the consciousness of the unseen agency. While man strives with man, prayer, suggested by God, moves God, the Ruler of all.
    Book: Amos