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Daniel 12:12

    Daniel 12:12 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Blessed is he that waiteth, and cometh to the thousand three hundred and five and thirty days.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Blessed is he that waits, and comes to the thousand three hundred and five and thirty days.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Blessed is he that waiteth, and cometh to the thousand three hundred and five and thirty days.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    A blessing will be on the man who goes on waiting, and comes to the thousand, three hundred and thirty-five days.

    Webster's Revision

    Blessed is he that waiteth, and cometh to the thousand three hundred and five and thirty days.

    World English Bible

    Blessed is he who waits, and comes to the one thousand three hundred thirty-five days.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Blessed is he that waiteth, and cometh to the thousand three hundred and five and thirty days.

    Definitions for Daniel 12:12

    Blessed - Happy.

    Clarke's Commentary on Daniel 12:12

    Blessed is he that waiteth - He who implicitly depends on God, expecting, as his truth cannot fail, that these predictions shall be accomplished in due time.

    And cometh to the thousand three hundred and five and thirty days - This is seventy-five days more than what is included in the three years and a half, or the time, times, and a half in the seventh verse; and as we have met with so many instances of prophets days and years, this undoubtedly is another instance; and as a day stands for a year, this must mean a period of one thousand three hundred and thirty-five years, which period is to bring all these wonders to an end, Daniel 12:6. But we are left totally in the dark relative to the time from which these one thousand three hundred and thirty-five years are to be reckoned. If, however, we reckon them from the above epoch, a.d. 612, when Mohammedanism arose, they lead us to a.d. 1947, when the fullness of the Gentiles shall be brought in; and thus a final closure of vision and prophecy be made, as then all the great events relative to the salvation of men shall have taken place. Wars and contentions will probably then cease over the whole world; Jews and Gentiles become one fold, under one Shepherd and Bishop of souls; and the triune God be properly worshipped and glorified, from generation to generation, over the face of the whole earth. But all these conjectures may be founded in darkness. We have not chronological data; and "the times and seasons God has reserved in his own power."

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 12:12

    Blessed is he that waiteth - This indicates a patient expectation of an event that was to occur, and the happy state of him who would reach it. The angel refers to another period different from the "time, and times, and an half," and different also from the twelve hundred and ninety days. He speaks of this as the consummation - as the desirable time; and pronounces him blessed who shall be permitted to see it. The idea here is, that of one looking out for this as a happy period, and that he would be regarded as a happy man who should live in that age.

    And cometh to - literally, "touches." That is, whose life would reach to that time; or who would not be cut off before that period.

    The thousand three hundred and five and thirty days - The article is not used in the original, and its insertion here seems to make the period more distinct and definite than it is necessarily in the Hebrew. There is much apparent abruptness in all these expressions; and what the angel says in these closing and additional communications has much the appearance of a fragmentary character - of hints, or detached and unexplained thoughts thrown out on which he was not disposed to enlarge, and which, for some reason, he was not inclined to explain. In respect to this period of 1335 days, it seems to stand by itself. Nothing is said of the time when it would occur; no intimation is given of its commencement, as in the former cases - the terminus a quo; and nothing is said of its characteristics further than that he would be blessed who should be permitted to see it - implying that it would be, on some accounts, a happy period.