Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Daniel 6:18

    Daniel 6:18 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting: neither were instruments of musick brought before him: and his sleep went from him.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting: neither were instruments of music brought before him: and his sleep went from him.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting; neither were instruments of music brought before him: and his sleep fled from him.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then the king went to his great house, and took no food that night, and no ... were placed before him, and his sleep went from him.

    Webster's Revision

    Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting; neither were instruments of music brought before him: and his sleep fled from him.

    World English Bible

    Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting; neither were instruments of music brought before him: and his sleep fled from him.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting: neither were instruments of music brought before him: and his sleep fled from him.

    Clarke's Commentary on Daniel 6:18

    Passed the night fasting - He neither ate nor drank, had no music to solace, nor sweet odors burnt or brought before him, and he passed the night without sleep. All this points out his great sincerity; and when it is considered that Darius could not be less than sixty-two or sixty-three years of age at this time, it shows more fully the depth of his concern.

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 6:18

    Then the king went to his palace, and passed the night fasting - Daniel was probably cast into the den soon after the going down of the sun, Daniel 6:14. It was not unusual to have suppers then late at night, as it is now in many places. The great anxiety of the king, however, on account of what had occurred, prevented him from participating in the usual evening meal. As to the probability of what is here affirmed, no one can have any doubt who credits the previous statements. In the consciousness of wrong done to a worthy officer of the government; in the deep anxiety which he had to deliver him; in the excitement which must have existed against the cunning and wicked authors of the plot to deceive the king and to ruin Daniel; and in his solicitude and hope that after all Daniel might escape, there is a satisfactory reason for the facts stated that he had no desire for food; that instruments of music were not brought before him; and that he passed a sleepless night.

    Neither were instruments of music brought before him - It was usual among the ancients to have music at their meals. This custom prevailed among the Greeks and Romans, and doubtless was common in the Oriental world. It should be observed, however, that there is considerable variety in the interpretation of the word here rendered instruments of music - דחון dachăvân. The margin is table. The Latin Vulgate, "He slept supperless, neither was food brought before him." The Greek renders it "food," ἐδέσματα edesmata. So the Syriac. Bertholdt and Gesenius render it concubines, and Saadias dancing girls. Any of these significations would be appropriate; but it is impossible to determine which is the most correct. The word does not occur elsewhere in the Scriptures.