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Daniel 7:15

    Daniel 7:15 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    I Daniel was grieved in my spirit in the midst of my body, and the visions of my head troubled me.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    I Daniel was grieved in my spirit in the middle of my body, and the visions of my head troubled me.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    As for me, Daniel, my spirit was grieved in the midst of my body, and the visions of my head troubled me.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    As for me, Daniel, my spirit was pained because of this, and the visions of my head were troubling me.

    Webster's Revision

    As for me, Daniel, my spirit was grieved in the midst of my body, and the visions of my head troubled me.

    World English Bible

    As for me, Daniel, my spirit was grieved in the midst of my body, and the visions of my head troubled me.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    As for me Daniel, my spirit was grieved in the midst of my body, and the visions of my head troubled me.

    Clarke's Commentary on Daniel 7:15

    I Daniel was grieved, etc. - The words in the original are uncommonly emphatic. My spirit was grieved, or sickened, בגו נדנה bego nidneh, within its sheath or scabbard. Which I think proves,

    1. That the human spirit is different from the body.

    2. That it has a proper subsistence independently of the body, which is only its sheath for a certain time.

    3. That the spirit may exist independently of its body, as the sword does independently of its sheath.

    Barnes' Notes on Daniel 7:15

    I Daniel was grieved in my spirit - That is, I was troubled; or my heart was made heavy and sad. This was probably in part because he did not fully understand the meaning of the vision, and partly on account of the fearful and momentous nature of what was indicated by it. So the apostle John Rev 5:4 says, "And I wept much because no man was found worthy to open and to read the book."

    In the midst of my body - Margin, as in the Chaldee, sheath. The body is undoubtedly referred to, and is so called as the envelope of the mind - or as that in which the soul is inserted, as the sword is in the sheath, and from which it is drawn out by death. The same metaphor is employed by Pliny: Donec cremato co inimici remeanti animae velut vaginam ademerint. So, too, a certain philosopher, who was slighted by Alexander the Great on account of his ugly face, is said to have replied, Corpus hominis nil est nisi vagina gladii in qua anima reconditur. - Gesenius. Compare Lengerke, in loc. See also Job 27:8, "When God taketh away his soul;" or rather draws out his soul, as a sword is drawn out of the sheath. Compare the note at that place. See also Buxtorf's Lexicon Tal. p. 1307. The meaning here is plain - that Daniel felt sad and troubled in mind, and that this produced a sensible effect on his body.

    And the visions of my head troubled me - The head is here regarded as the seat of the intellect, and he speaks of these visions as if they were seen by the head. That is, they seemed to pass before his eyes.