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Deuteronomy 10:16

    Deuteronomy 10:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiff necked.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Let your circumcision be of the heart, and put away your pride.

    Webster's Revision

    Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked.

    World English Bible

    Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiff-necked.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked.

    Clarke's Commentary on Deuteronomy 10:16

    Circumcise - the foreskin of your heart - A plain proof from God himself that this precept pointed out spiritual things, and that it was not the cutting away a part of the flesh that was the object of the Divine commandment, but the purification of the soul, without which all forms and ceremonies are of no avail. Loving God with all the heart, soul, mind, and strength, the heart being circumcised to enable them to do it, was, from the beginning, the end, design, and fulfillment of the whole law.

    Barnes' Notes on Deuteronomy 10:16

    On "circumcision" see Genesis 17:10. This verse points to the spiritual import of circumcision. Man is by nature "very far gone from original righteousness," and in a state of enmity to God; by circumcision, as the sacrament of admission to the privileges of the chosen people, this opposition must be taken away ere man could enter into covenant with God. It was through the flesh that man first sinned; as it is also in the flesh, its functions, lusts, etc., that man's rebellion against God chiefly manifests itself still. It was fitting therefore that the symbol which should denote the removal of this estrangement from God should be worked in the body. Moses then fitly follows up the command "to circumcise the heart," with the warning "to be no more stiff-necked." His meaning is that they should lay aside that obduracy and perverseness toward God for which he had been reproving them, which had led them into so many transgressions of the covenant and revolts from God, and which was especially the very contrary of that love and fear of God required by the first two of the Ten Commandments. The language associated with circumcision in the Bible distinguishes the use made of this rite in the Jewish religion from that found among certain pagan nations. Circumcision was practiced by some of them as a religious rite, designed (e. g.) to appease the deity of death who was supposed to delight in human suffering; but not by any, the Egyptians probably excepted, at all in the Jewish sense and meaning.

    The grounds on which circumcision was imposed as essential by the Law are the same as those on which Baptism is required in the Gospel. The latter in the New Testament is strictly analogous to the former under the Old; compare Colossians 2:11-12.

    Wesley's Notes on Deuteronomy 10:16

    10:16 Circumcise - Rest not in your bodily circumcision, but seriously set upon that substantial work which is signified thereby: cleanse your hearts from all filthiness and superfluity of naughtiness, fitly compared to the foreskin, which if not cut off, made persons profane, unclean and odious in the sight of God.