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Deuteronomy 19:14

    Deuteronomy 19:14 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Thou shalt not remove thy neighbour's landmark, which they of old time have set in thine inheritance, which thou shalt inherit in the land that the LORD thy God giveth thee to possess it.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    You shall not remove your neighbor's landmark, which they of old time have set in your inheritance, which you shall inherit in the land that the LORD your God gives you to possess it.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Thou shalt not remove thy neighbor's landmark, which they of old time have set, in thine inheritance which thou shalt inherit, in the land that Jehovah thy God giveth thee to possess it.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Your neighbour's landmark, which was put in its place by the men of old times, is not to be moved or taken away in the land of your heritage which the Lord your God is giving you.

    Webster's Revision

    Thou shalt not remove thy neighbor's landmark, which they of old time have set, in thine inheritance which thou shalt inherit, in the land that Jehovah thy God giveth thee to possess it.

    World English Bible

    You shall not remove your neighbor's landmark, which they of old time have set, in your inheritance which you shall inherit, in the land that Yahweh your God gives you to possess it.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Thou shalt not remove thy neighbour's landmark, which they of old time have set, in thine inheritance which thou shalt inherit, in the land that the LORD thy God giveth thee to possess it.

    Clarke's Commentary on Deuteronomy 19:14

    Thou shalt not remove thy neighbor's landmark - Before the extensive use of fences, landed property was marked out by stones or posts, set up so as to ascertain the divisions of family estates. It was easy to remove one of these landmarks, and set it in a different place; and thus the dishonest man enlarged his own estate by contracting that of his neighbor. The termini or landmarks among the Romans were held very sacred, and were at last deified.

    To these termini Numa Pompillus commanded offerings of broth, cakes, and firstfruits, to be made. And Ovid informs us that it was customary to sacrifice a lamb to them, and sprinkle them with its blood: -

    Spargitur et caeso communis terminus agno.

    Fast. lib. ii., ver. 655.

    And from Tibullus it appears that they sometimes adorned them with flowers and garlands: -

    Nam veneror, seu stipes habet desertus inagris,

    Seu vetus in trivio florida serta lap is.

    Eleg. lib. i., E. i., ver. 11.

    "Revere each antique stone bedeck'd with flowers,

    That bounds the field, or points the doubtful way."

    Grainger.

    It appears from Juvenal that annual oblations were made to them: -

    - Convallem ruris aviti

    Improbus, aut campum mihi si vicinus ademit,

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Deuteronomy 19:14

    As a man's life is to be held sacred, so are his means of livelihood; and in this connection a prohibition is inserted against removing a neighbor's landmark: compare the marginal references.