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Deuteronomy 22:7

    Deuteronomy 22:7 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But thou shalt in any wise let the dam go, and take the young to thee; that it may be well with thee, and that thou mayest prolong thy days.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But you shall in any wise let the dam go, and take the young to you; that it may be well with you, and that you may prolong your days.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    thou shalt surely let the dam go, but the young thou mayest take unto thyself; that it may be well with thee, and that thou mayest prolong thy days.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    See that you let the mother bird go, but the young ones you may take; so it will be well for you and your life will be long.

    Webster's Revision

    thou shalt surely let the dam go, but the young thou mayest take unto thyself; that it may be well with thee, and that thou mayest prolong thy days.

    World English Bible

    you shall surely let the hen go, but the young you may take to yourself; that it may be well with you, and that you may prolong your days.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    thou shalt in any wise let the dam go, but the young thou mayest take unto thyself; that it may be well with thee, and that thou mayest prolong thy days.

    Definitions for Deuteronomy 22:7

    Dam - A mother.
    In any wise - Surely.
    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Deuteronomy 22:7

    Thou shalt - let the dam go, and take the young to thee; that it may be well with thee - This passage may be understood literally. If they destroyed both young and old, must not the breed soon fail, and would it not in the end be ill with them; and by thus cutting off the means of their continual support, must not their days be shortened on the land? But we may look for a humane precept in this law. The young never knew the sweets of liberty; the dam did: they might be taken and used for any lawful purpose, but the dam must not be brought into a state of captivity. They who can act otherwise must be either very inconsiderate or devoid of feeling; and such persons can never be objects of God's peculiar care and attention, and therefore need not expect that it shall be well with them, or that they shall prolong their days on the earth. Every thing contrary to the spirit of mercy and kindness the ever blessed God has in utter abhorrence. And we should remember a fact, that he who can exercise cruelty towards a sparrow or a wren, will, when circumstances are favorable, be cruel to his fellow creatures. The poet Phocylides has a maxim in his admonitory poem very similar to that in the sacred text: -

    Μηδε τις ορυιθας καλιης ἁμα παντας ἑλεσθω·

    Μητερα δ' εκπρολιπῃς, ἱν' εχῃς παλι τησδε νεοττους.

    Phocyl. Ποιημα Νουθετ., ver. 80.

    "Nor from a nest take all the birds away;

    The mother spare, she'll breed a future day."