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Ecclesiastes 10:5

    Ecclesiastes 10:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, as an error which proceedeth from the ruler:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, as an error which proceeds from the ruler:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, as it were an error which proceedeth from the ruler:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, like an error which comes by chance from a ruler:

    Webster's Revision

    There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, as it were an error which proceedeth from the ruler:

    World English Bible

    There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, the sort of error which proceeds from the ruler.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    There is an evil which I have seen under the sun, as it were an error which proceedeth from the ruler:

    Clarke's Commentary on Ecclesiastes 10:5

    An error which proceedeth from the ruler - What this error in the ruler is, the two following verses point out: it is simpiy this - an injudicious distribution of offices, and raising people to places of trust and confidence, who are destitute of merit, are neither of name nor family to excite public confidence, and are without property; so that they have no stake in the country, and their only solicitude must naturally be to enrich themselves, and provide for their poor relatives. This is frequent in the governments of the world; and favouritism has often brought prosperous nations to the brink of ruin. Folly was set in dignity; the man of property, sense, and name, in a low place. Servants - menial men, rode upon horses - carried every thing with a high and proud hand; and princes, - the nobles of the people, were obliged to walk by their sides, and often from the state of things to become in effect their servants. This was often the case in this country, during the reign of Thomas a Becket, and Cardinal Woolsey. These insolent men lorded it over the whole nation; and the people and their gentry were raised or depressed according as their pride and caprice willed. And, through this kind of errors, not only a few sovereigns have had most uncomfortable and troublesome reigns, but some have even lost their lives.