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Ecclesiastes 6:9

    Ecclesiastes 6:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this is also vanity and vexation of spirit.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this is also vanity and vexation of spirit.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this also is vanity and a striving after wind.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    What the eyes see is better than the wandering of desire. This is to no purpose and a desire for wind.

    Webster's Revision

    Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this also is vanity and a striving after wind.

    World English Bible

    Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire. This also is vanity and a chasing after wind.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this also is vanity and a striving after wind.

    Clarke's Commentary on Ecclesiastes 6:9

    Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire - This is translated by the Vulgate, as a sort of adage: Melius est videre quod cupias, quam desiderare quod nescias, "It is better to see what one desires than to covet what one knows not." It is better to enjoy the present than to feed one's self with vain desires of the future. What we translate the wandering of desire, מהלך נפש mehaloch nephesh, is the travelling of the soul. What is this? Does it simply mean desire? Or is there any reference here to the state of separate spirits! It however shows the soul to be in a restless state, and consequently to be unhappy. If Christ dwell in the heart by faith, the soul is then at rest, and this is properly the rest of the people of God.

    Wesley's Notes on Ecclesiastes 6:9

    6:9 The fight - The comfortable enjoyment of what a man hath. Than - Restless desires of what a man hath not. This - Wandering of the desire.