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Ephesians 3:13

    Ephesians 3:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wherefore I desire that ye faint not at my tribulations for you, which is your glory.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Why I desire that you faint not at my tribulations for you, which is your glory.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Wherefore I ask that ye may not faint at my tribulations for you, which are your glory.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For this reason it is my prayer that you may not become feeble because of my troubles for you, which are your glory.

    Webster's Revision

    Wherefore I ask that ye may not faint at my tribulations for you, which are your glory.

    World English Bible

    Therefore I ask that you may not lose heart at my troubles for you, which are your glory.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Wherefore I ask that ye faint not at my tribulations for you, which are your glory.

    Definitions for Ephesians 3:13

    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on Ephesians 3:13

    I desire that ye faint not - In those primitive times, when there was much persecution, people were in continual danger of falling away from the faith who were not well grounded in it. This the apostle deprecates, and advances a strong reason why they should be firm: "I suffer my present imprisonment on account of demonstrating your privileges, of which the Jews are envious: I bear my afflictions patiently, knowing that what I have advanced is of God, and thus I give ample proof of the sincerity of my own conviction. The sufferings, therefore, of your apostles are honorable to you and to your cause; and far from being any cause why you should faint, or draw back like cowards, in the day of distress, they should be an additional argument to induce you to persevere."

    Barnes' Notes on Ephesians 3:13

    Wherefore I desire that ye faint not - The connection here is this. Paul was then a prisoner at Rome. He had been made such in consequence of his efforts to diffuse the Christian religion among the Gentiles; see the notes at Ephesians 3:1. His zeal in this cause, and the opinions which he held on this subject, had roused the wrath of the Jews, and led to all the calamities which he was now suffering. Of that the Ephesians. he supposes, were aware. It was natural that they should be distressed at his sufferings, for all his privations were endured on their account. But here he tells them not to be troubled and disheartened. He was indeed suffering; but he was reconciled to it, and they should be also, since it was promoting their welfare. The word rendered "faint" - ἐκκακέω egkakeō - means literally, to turn out "a coward," or to lose one's courage; then to be fainthearted, etc.; notes, 2 Corinthians 4:1. It is rendered "faint" in Luke 18:1; 2 Corinthians 4:1, 2 Corinthians 4:16; Ephesians 3:13, and "weary" in Galatians 6:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:13. It does not elsewhere occur. It is rendered here by Locke "dismayed." Koppe supposes it means that they should not suppose that the Christian religion was vain and false because he was suffering so much from his countrymen on account of it. But it rather means that they might be in danger of being discouraged by the fact that "he" was enduring so much. They might become disheartened in their attachment to a system of religion which exposed its friends to such calamities. Paul tells them that this ought not to follow. They were to be profited by all his sufferings, and they should, therefore, hold fast to a religion which was attended with so many benefits to them - though he should suffer.

    Which is your glory - Which tends to your honor and welfare. You have occasion to rejoice that you have a friend who is willing thus to suffer for you; you have occasion to rejoice in all the benefits which will result to you from, his trials in your behalf.

    Wesley's Notes on Ephesians 3:13

    3:13 The not fainting is your glory.