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Ephesians 6:13

    Ephesians 6:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Why take to you the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Wherefore take up the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and, having done all, to stand.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    For this reason take up all the arms of God, so that you may be able to be strong in the evil day, and, having done all, to keep your place.

    Webster's Revision

    Wherefore take up the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and, having done all, to stand.

    World English Bible

    Therefore, put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and, having done all, to stand.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Wherefore take up the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and, having done all, to stand.

    Definitions for Ephesians 6:13

    Wherefore - Why?; for what reason?; for what cause?

    Clarke's Commentary on Ephesians 6:13

    Wherefore - Because ye have such enemies to contend with, take unto you - assume, as provided and prepared for you, the whole armor of God; which armor if you put on and use, you shall be both invulnerable and immortal. The ancient heroes are fabled to have had armor sent to them by the gods; and even the great armor-maker, Vulcan, was reputed to be a god himself. This was fable: What Paul speaks of is reality. See before on Ephesians 6:11 (note).

    That ye may be able to withstand - That ye may not only stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made you free, but also discomfit all your spiritual foes; and continuing in your ranks, maintain your ground against them, never putting off your armor, but standing always ready prepared to repel any new attack.

    And having done all, to stand - Και ἁπαντα κατεργασαμενοι στηναι· rather, And having conquered all, stand: this is a military phrase, and is repeatedly used in this sense by the best Greek writers. So Dionys. Hal. Ant., lib. vi., page 400: Και παντα πολεμια εν ολιγῳ κατεργασαμενοι χρονῳ· "Having in a short time discomfited all our enemies, we returned with numerous captives and much spoil." See many examples in Kypke. By evil day we may understand any time of trouble, affliction, and sore temptation.

    As there is here allusion to some of the most important parts of the Grecian armor, I shall give a short account of the whole. It consisted properly of two sorts:

    1. Defensive armor, or that which protected themselves.

    2. Offensive armor, or that by which they injured their enemies. The apostle refers to both.

    I. Defensive Armor

    Περικεφαλαια, the Helmet; this was the armor for the head, and was of various forms, and embossed with a great variety of figures. Connected with the helmet was the crest or ridge on the top of the helmet, adorned with several emblematic figures; some for ornament, some to strike terror. For crests on ancient helmets we often see the winged lion, the griffin, chimera, etc. St. Paul seems to refer to one which had an emblematical representation of hope.

    Ζωμα, the Girdle; this went about the loins, and served to brace the armor tight to the body, and to support daggers, short swords, and such like weapons, which were frequently stuck in it. This kind of girdle is in general use among the Asiatic nations to the present day.

    Θωραξ, the Breast-Plate; this consisted of two parts, called πτερυγες or wings: one covered the whole region of the thorax or breast, in which the principal viscera of life are contained; and the other covered the back, as far down as the front part extended.

    Κνημιδες, Greaves or brazen boots, which covered the shin or front of the leg; a kind of solea was often used, which covered the sole, and laced about the instep, and prevented the foot from being wounded by rugged ways, thorns, stones, etc.

    Χειριδες, Gauntlets; a kind of gloves that served to defend the hands, and the arm up to the elbow.

    Ασπις, the clypeus or Shield; it was perfectly round, and sometimes made of wood, covered with bullocks' hides; but often made of metal. The aspis or shield of Achilles, made by Vulcan, was composed of five plates, two of brass, two of tin, and one of gold; so Homer, Il. U. v. 270: -

    - επει πεντε πτυχας ηλασε Κυλλοποδιων,

    continued...

    Barnes' Notes on Ephesians 6:13

    In the evil day - The day of temptation; the day when you are violently assaulted.

    And having done all, to stand - Margin, "or overcome." The Greek word means, to work out, effect, or produce; and then to work up, to make an end of, to vanquish. Robinson, Lexicon. The idea seems to be, that they were to overcome or vanquish all their foes, and thus to stand firm. The whole language here is taken from war; and the idea is, that every foe was to be subdued - no matter how numerous or formidable they might be. Safety and triumph could be looked for only when every enemy was slain.

    Wesley's Notes on Ephesians 6:13

    6:13 In the evil day - The war is perpetual; but the fight is one day less, another more, violent. The evil day is either at the approach of death, or in life; may be longer or shorter and admits of numberless varieties. And having done all, to stand - That ye may still keep on your armour, still stand upon your guard, still watch and pray; and thus ye will be enabled to endure unto the end, and stand with joy before the face of the Son of Man.