Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Esther 5:13

    Esther 5:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Yet all this availeth me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai the Jew sitting at the king's gate.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Yet all this avails me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai the Jew sitting at the king's gate.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Yet all this availeth me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai the Jew sitting at the king's gate.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But all this is nothing to me while I see Mordecai the Jew seated by the king's doorway.

    Webster's Revision

    Yet all this availeth me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai the Jew sitting at the king's gate.

    World English Bible

    Yet all this avails me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai the Jew sitting at the king's gate."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Yet all this availeth me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai the Jew sitting at the king's gate.

    Clarke's Commentary on Esther 5:13

    Yet all this availeth me nothing - Pride will ever render its possessor unhappy. He has such a high opinion of his own worth, that he conceives himself defrauded by every one who does not pay him all the respect and homage which he conceives to be his due.

    The soul was made for God, and nothing but God can fill it and make it happy. Angels could not be happy in glory, when they had cast off their allegiance to their Maker. As soon as his heart had departed from God, Adam would needs go to the forbidden fruit, to satisfy a desire which was only an indication of his having been unfaithful to his God. Solomon, in all his glory, possessing every thing heart could wish, found all to be vanity and vexation of spirit; because his soul had not God for its portion. Ahab, on the throne of Israel, takes to his bed, and refuses to eat bread, not merely because he cannot get the vineyard of Naboth, but because he had not God in his heart, who could alone satisfy its desires. Haman, on the same ground, though the prime favourite of the king, is wretched because he cannot have a bow from that man whom his heart even despised. O, how distressing are the inquietudes of vanity. And how wretched is the man who has not the God of Jacob for his help, and in whose heart Christ dwells not by faith!