Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Exodus 12:10

    Exodus 12:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And you shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remains of it until the morning you shall burn with fire.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; but that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Do not keep any of it till the morning; anything which is not used is to be burned with fire.

    Webster's Revision

    And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; but that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire.

    World English Bible

    You shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; but that which remains of it until the morning you shall burn with fire.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; but that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire.

    Definitions for Exodus 12:10

    Let - To hinder or obstruct.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 12:10

    Ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning - Merely to prevent putrefaction; for it was not meet that a thing offered to God should be subjected to corruption, which in such hot countries it must speedily undergo. Thus the body of our blessed Lord saw no corruption, Psalm 16:10; Acts 2:27, because, like the paschal lamb, it was a sacrifice offered to God.

    It appears that from the Jewish passover the heathens borrowed their sacrifice termed Propter Viam. It was their custom previously to their undertaking a journey, to offer a sacrifice to their gods, and to eat the whole if possible, but if any part was left they burned it with fire; and this was called propter viam, because it was made to procure a prosperous journey. It was in reference to this that Cato is said to have rallied a person called Q. Albidius, who, having eaten up all his goods, set fire to his house, his only remaining property. "He has offered his sacrifice propter viam," says Cato, "because he has burned what he could not eat." This account is given by Macrobius, Saturn., lib. ii., 2, edit. Bipont., vol. 1, p. 333; and is a remarkable instance how closely some of the religious observances of the people of God have been copied by the heathen nations.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 12:10

    This was afterward a general law of sacrifices; at once preventing all possibility of profanity, and of superstitious abuse. The injunction is on both accounts justly applied by our Church to the eucharist.

    Burn with fire - Not being consumed by man, it was thus offered, like other sacrifices Exodus 12:8, to God.

    Wesley's Notes on Exodus 12:10

    12:10 Ye shall burn with fire - To prevent the profane abuse of it.