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Exodus 12:8

    Exodus 12:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; and with bitter herbs they shall eat it.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; and with bitter herbs they shall eat it.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; with bitter herbs they shall eat it.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And let your food that night be the flesh of the lamb, cooked with fire in the oven, together with unleavened bread and bitter-tasting plants.

    Webster's Revision

    And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; with bitter herbs they shall eat it.

    World English Bible

    They shall eat the flesh in that night, roasted with fire, and unleavened bread. They shall eat it with bitter herbs.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; with bitter herbs they shall eat it.

    Definitions for Exodus 12:8

    Herbs - Vegetables.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 12:8

    They shall eat the flesh - roast with fire - As it was the ordinary custom of the Jews to boil their flesh, some think that the command given here was in opposition to the custom of the Egyptians, who ate raw flesh in honor of Osiris. The Ethiopians are to this day remarkable for eating raw flesh, as is the case with most savage nations.

    Unleavened bread - מצות matstsoth, from מצה matsah, to squeeze or compress, because the bread prepared without leaven or yeast was generally compressed, sad or heavy, as we term it. The word here properly signifies unleavened cakes; the word for leaven in Hebrew is חמץ chamets, which simply signifies to ferment. It is supposed that leaven was forbidden on this and other occasions, that the bread being less agreeable to the taste, it might be emblematical of their bondage and bitter servitude, as this seems to have been one design of the bitter herbs which were commanded to be used on this occasion; but this certainly was not the sole design of the prohibition: leaven itself is a species of corruption, being produced by fermentation, which in such cases tends to putrefaction. In this very light St. Paul considers the subject in this place; hence, alluding to the passover as a type of Christ, he says: Purge out therefore the old leaven - for Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth; 1 Corinthians 5:6-8.

    Bitter herbs - What kind of herbs or salad is intended by the word מררים merorim, which literally signifies bitters, is not well known. The Jews think chicory, wild lettuce, horehound, and the like are intended. Whatever may be implied under the term, whether bitter herbs or bitter ingredients in general, it was designed to put them in mind of their bitter and severe bondage in the land of Egypt, from which God was now about to deliver them.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 12:8

    In that night - The night is thus clearly distinguished from the evening when the lamb was slain. It was slain before sunset, on the 14th, and eaten after sunset, the beginning of the 15th.

    With fire - Among various reasons given for this injunction the most probable and satisfactory seems to be the special sanctity attached to fire from the first institution of sacrifice (compare Genesis 4:4).

    And unleavened bread - On account of the hasty departure, allowing no time for the process of leavening: but the meaning discerned by Paul, 1 Corinthians 5:7-8, and recognized by the Church in all ages, was assuredly implied, though not expressly declared in the original institution. Compare our Lord's words, Matthew 16:6, Matthew 16:12, as to the symbolism of leaven.

    Bitter herbs - The word occurs only here and in Numbers 9:11, in reference to herbs. The symbolic reference to the previous sufferings of the Israelites is generally admitted.