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Exodus 21:1

    Exodus 21:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Now these are the judgments which thou shalt set before them.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Now these are the judgments which you shall set before them.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Now these are the ordinances which thou shalt set before them.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now these are the laws which you are to put before them.

    Webster's Revision

    Now these are the ordinances which thou shalt set before them.

    World English Bible

    "Now these are the ordinances which you shall set before them.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Now these are the judgments which thou shalt set before them.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 21:1

    Now these are the judgments - There is so much good sense, feeling, humanity, equity, and justice in the following laws, that they cannot but be admired by every intelligent reader; and they are so very plain as to require very little comment. The laws in this chapter are termed political, those in the succeeding chapter judicial, laws; and are supposed to have been delivered to Moses alone, in consequence of the request of the people, Exodus 20:19, that God should communicate his will to Moses, and that Moses should, as mediator, convey it to them.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 21:1

    Judgments - i. e. decisions of the law.

    Wesley's Notes on Exodus 21:1

    21:1 The first verse is the general title of the laws contained in this and the two following chapter s. Their government being purely a theocracy; that which in other states is to be settled by human prudence, was directed among them by a divine appointment. These laws are called judgments; because their magistrates were to give judgment according to them. In the doubtful cases that had hitherto occurred, Moses had particularly enquired of God, but now God gave him statutes in general, by which to determine particular cases. He begins with the laws concerning servants, commanding mercy and moderation towards them. The Israelites had lately been servants themselves, and now they were become not only their own matters, but masters of servants too; lest they should abuse their servants as they themselves had been abused, provision was made for the mild and gentle usage of servants.