Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Exodus 25:16

    Exodus 25:16 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And thou shalt put into the ark the testimony which I shall give thee.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And you shall put into the ark the testimony which I shall give you.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And thou shalt put into the ark the testimony which I shall give thee.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Inside the ark you are to put the record which I will give you.

    Webster's Revision

    And thou shalt put into the ark the testimony which I shall give thee.

    World English Bible

    You shall put the testimony which I shall give you into the ark.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And thou shalt put into the ark the testimony which I shall give thee.

    Definitions for Exodus 25:16

    Ark - Box; chest.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 25:16

    The testimony - The two tables of stone which were not yet given; these tables were called עדת eduth, from עד forward, onward, to bear witness to or of a person or thing. Not only the tables of stone, but all the contents of the ark, Aaron's rod, the pot of manna, the holy anointing oil, etc., bore testimony to the Messiah in his prophetic, sacerdotal, and regal offices.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 25:16

    The testimony - Literally, "something spoken again and again." The stone tables of the Ten Commandments are called the Testimony, or, the tables of the Testimony, as the ark which contained them is called the ark of the Testimony, and the tabernacle in which the ark was placed, the tabernacle of the testimony. Taking this in connection with the prohibitory form of the commandments, the name must have been understood as signifying the direct testimony of Yahweh against sin in man Deuteronomy 31:26-27.

    The ark of the covenant has been most generally likened to the arks, or moveable shrines, which are represented on Egyptian monuments. The Egyptian arks were carried by poles on the shoulders, and some of them had on the cover two winged figures not unlike what we conceive the golden cherubim to have been. Thus far the similarity is striking. But there were points of great dissimilarity. Between the winged figures on the Egyptian arks there was placed the material symbol of a deity, and the arks themselves were carried about in religious processions, so as to make a show in the eyes of the people. We know not what they contained. As regards the ark of the covenant, the absence of any symbol of God was one of its great characteristics. It was never carried in a ceremonial procession: when it was moved from one place to another, it was closely packed up, concealed from the eyes even of the Levites who bore it. When the tabernacle was pitched, the ark was never exhibited, but was kept in solemn darkness. Rest, it is evident, was its appointed condition. It was occasionally moved out of its place in the holy of holies, but only so long as the nation was without a settled capital, and had something of the character of an army on the march. Not less was it distinguished from all other arks in the simple grandeur of its purpose: it was constructed to contain the plain text of the Ten Commandments written on stone in words that were intelligible to all.