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Exodus 34:21

    Exodus 34:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Six days thou shalt work, but on the seventh day thou shalt rest: in earing time and in harvest thou shalt rest.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Six days you shall work, but on the seventh day you shall rest: in ripening time and in harvest you shall rest.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Six days thou shalt work, but on the seventh day thou shalt rest: in plowing time and in harvest thou shalt rest.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Six days let work be done, but on the seventh day take your rest: at ploughing time and at the grain-cutting you are to have a day for rest.

    Webster's Revision

    Six days thou shalt work, but on the seventh day thou shalt rest: in plowing time and in harvest thou shalt rest.

    World English Bible

    "Six days you shall work, but on the seventh day you shall rest: in plowing time and in harvest you shall rest.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Six days thou shalt work, but on the seventh day thou shalt rest: in plowing time and in harvest thou shalt rest.

    Definitions for Exodus 34:21

    Earing - Plowing; tilling the ground.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 34:21

    In earing time and in harvest thou shalt rest - This commandment is worthy of especial note; many break the Sabbath on the pretense of absolute necessity, because, if in harvest time the weather happens to be what is called bad, and the Sabbath day be fair and fine, they judge it perfectly lawful to employ that day in endeavoring to save the fruits of the field, and think that the goodness of the day beyond the preceding, is an indication from Providence that it should be thus employed. But is not the above command pointed directly against this? I have known this law often broken on this pretense, and have never been able to discover a single instance where the persons who acted thus succeeded one whit better than their more conscientious neighbors, who availed themselves of no such favorable circumstances, being determined to keep God's law, even to the prejudice of their secular interests; but no man ever yet ultimately suffered loss by a conscientious attachment to his duty to God. He who is willing and obedient, shall eat the good of the land; but God will ever distinguish those in his providence who respect his commandments.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 34:21

    See Exodus 20:9; Exodus 23:12. There is here added to the commandment a particular caution respecting those times of year when the land calls for most labor. The old verb "to ear" (i. e. to plow) is genuine English.

    Wesley's Notes on Exodus 34:21

    34:21 Here is a repetition of several appointments made before, especially relating to their solemn feasts: when they had made the calf they proclaimed a feast in honour of it; now, that they might never do so again, they are here charged with the observance of the feasts which God had instituted. Thou shalt rest, even in earing - time and in harvest - The most busy times of the year. All wordly business must give way to that holy rest: harvest - work will prosper the better for the religious observation of the sabbath - day in harvest - time. Hereby we must shew that we prefer our communion with God, before either the business or the joy of harvest.