Search the Bible
* powered by Bible Study Tools

Exodus 36:5

    Exodus 36:5 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And they spake unto Moses, saying, The people bring much more than enough for the service of the work, which the LORD commanded to make.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And they spoke to Moses, saying, The people bring much more than enough for the service of the work, which the LORD commanded to make.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And they spake unto Moses, saying, The people bring much more than enough for the service of the work which Jehovah commanded to make.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And said to Moses, The people are giving much more than is needed for the work which the Lord has given us orders to do.

    Webster's Revision

    And they spake unto Moses, saying, The people bring much more than enough for the service of the work which Jehovah commanded to make.

    World English Bible

    They spoke to Moses, saying, "The people bring much more than enough for the service of the work which Yahweh commanded to make."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and they spake unto Moses, saying, The people bring much more than enough for the service of the work, which the LORD commanded to make.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 36:5

    The people bring much more than enough - With what a liberal spirit do these people bring their free-will offerings unto the Lords! Moses is obliged to make a proclamation to prevent them from bringing any more, as there was at present more than enough! Had Moses been intent upon gain, and had he not been perfectly disinterested, he would have encouraged them to continue their contributions, as thereby he might have multiplied to himself gold, silver, and precious stones. But he was doing the Lord's work, under the inspiration of the Divine Spirit, and therefore he sought no secular gain. Indeed, this one circumstance is an ample proof of it. Every thing necessary for the worship of God will be cheerfully provided by a people whose hearts are in that worship. In a state where all forms of religion and modes of worship are tolerated by the laws, it would be well to find out some less exceptionable way of providing for the national clergy than by tithes. Let them by all means have the provision allowed them by the law; but let them not be needlessly exposed to the resentment of the people by the mode in which this provision is made, as this often alienates the affections of their flocks from them, and exceedingly injures their usefulness. See Clarke's note on Genesis 28:22, in fine, where the subject is viewed on all sides.