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Exodus 9:32

    Exodus 9:32 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But the wheat and the rie were not smitten: for they were not grown up.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But the wheat and the rye were not smitten: for they were not grown up.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    But the wheat and the spelt were not smitten: for they were not grown up.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But the rest of the grain-plants were undamaged, for they had not come up.

    Webster's Revision

    But the wheat and the spelt were not smitten: for they were not grown up.

    World English Bible

    But the wheat and the spelt were not struck, for they had not grown up.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    But the wheat and the spelt were not smitten: for they were not grown up.

    Definitions for Exodus 9:32

    Rie - Rye; a grain.

    Clarke's Commentary on Exodus 9:32

    But the wheat and the rye were not smitten - Wheat, חטה chittah, which Mr. Parkhurst thinks should be derived from the Chaldee and Samaritan חטי chati, which signifies tender, delicious, delicate, because of the superiority of its flavor, etc., to every other kind of grain. But this term in Scripture appears to mean any kind of bread-corn. Rye, כסמת cussemeth, from כסם casam, to have long hair; and hence, though the particular species is not known, the word must mean some bearded grain. The Septuagint call it ολυρα, the Vulgate for, and Aquila ζεα, which signify the grain called spelt; and some suppose that rice is meant.

    Mr. Harmer, referring to the double harvest in Egypt mentioned by Dr. Pocock, says that the circumstance of the wheat and the rye being אפילת aphiloth, dark or hidden, as the margin renders it, (i.e., they were sown, but not grown up), shows that it was the Indian wheat or surgo rosso mentioned Exodus 9:31, which, with the rye, escaped, while the barley and flax were smitten because they were at or nearly at a state of maturity. See Harmer's Obs., vol. iv., p. 11, edit 1808. But what is intended by the words in the Hebrew text we cannot positively say, as there is a great variety of opinions on this subject, both among the versions and the commentators. The Anglo-Saxon translator, probably from not knowing the meaning of the words, omits the whole verse.

    Barnes' Notes on Exodus 9:32

    Rie - Rather, "spelt," the common food of the ancient Egyptians, now called "doora" by the natives, and the only grain represented on the sculptures: the name, however, occurs on the monuments very frequently in combination with other species.