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Ezekiel 48:35

    Ezekiel 48:35 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    It was round about eighteen thousand measures: and the name of the city from that day shall be, The LORD is there.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    It was round about eighteen thousand measures: and the name of the city from that day shall be, The LORD is there.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    It shall be eighteen thousand reeds round about: and the name of the city from that day shall be, Jehovah is there.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    It is to be eighteen thousand all round: and the name of the town from that day will be, The Lord is there.

    Webster's Revision

    It shall be eighteen thousand reeds round about: and the name of the city from that day shall be, Jehovah is there.

    World English Bible

    It shall be eighteen thousand [reeds] around: and the name of the city from that day shall be, Yahweh is there.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    It shall be eighteen thousand reeds round about: and the name of the city from that day shall be, The LORD is there.

    Clarke's Commentary on Ezekiel 48:35

    The name of the city from that day shall be, The Lord is there - It would have been better to have retained the original words: -

    יהוה שמה

    Yehovah Shammah.

    This is an allusion to the shechinah, or symbol of the Divine Presence, which was in the first, but most certainly was not in the second temple; but Ezekiel tells us that the Divine Presence should be in the city of which he speaks; and should be there so fully and so powerfully, that it should give name to the city itself; and that the very name, Jehovah shammah, should remind all men of the supereminently glorious Being who had condescended to make this city his habitation.

    Two points must be considered here: -

    1. That the prophet intended that, when they should be restored, they should build the temple, and divide the land as he here directs, if the thing could be found to be practicable.

    2. That he had another temple, another holy city, another Promised Land, in view. The land of Immanuel, the city of the New Jerusalem; and his temple, the Christian Church, which is the house of the living God, 1 Timothy 3:15, in which the presence of Christ shall ever be found; and all its inhabitants, all that believe on his name, shall be temples of the Holy Ghost. Nor can there be any reasonable doubt that the prophet here, by the Spirit of God, not only points out the return of the Israelites from the Babylonish captivity, and what was to befall them previously to the advent of Jesus Christ; but also the glorious spread of the Gospel in the earth, and the final conversion of the tribes of Israel by the preaching of that Gospel.

    In conclusion, I think it necessary to state, that there are but few of the prophets of the Old Testament who have left a more valuable treasure to the Church of God than Ezekiel. It is true, he is in several places obscure; but there is a great proportion of the work that is in the highest degree edifying; and several portions that for the depth of the salvation predicted, and the accuracy and minuteness of the description, have nothing equal to them in the Old Testament Scriptures. On such portions, I have felt it my duty to be very particular, that I might be able to point out spiritual beauties and excellencies in this book which are beyond all praise; while I passed slightly over prophecies and symbols which I did not fully understand; but have left to time, by the fulfillment of the events, to prove to successive generations with what heavenly wisdom this much neglected prophet has spoken. And I take this opportunity to recommend this book to the serious perusal of every pious man; and while he wonders at the extent of the wisdom by which Ezekiel has fathomed the depth of so many Divine mysteries, let him give God the glory for this additional testimony to the unsearchable riches of Christ, and that plenary salvation which he has purchased for, and freely offers to, the vilest of the vile, and to the whole of the descendants of Adam.

    Masoretic Notes

    Number of verses, 1, 273.

    Middle verse, Ezekiel 26:1.

    Masoretic sections, 29.

    Barnes' Notes on Ezekiel 48:35

    The circuit of the city walls, a square of 4500 reeds, was 18,000 reeds, not quite 37 English miles. The circuit of Jerusalem in the time of Josephus was reckoned by him to be about four miles.

    The name ... - The manner of expressing a spiritual meaning by giving a name to a city, a people, or the like, is familiar to the prophets (see Ezekiel 43:15 note). Jerome explains it: "The name of the city shall be no longer Jerusalem ("the vision of peace"), but Adonai-shama ("the Lord is there") (rather, Jehovah-shammah, "Jehovah is there"), because Yahweh will never again withdraw from it, as He once withdrew, but will hold it as His everlasting possession." The visible presence of God's glory, once represented in the tabernacle and in the temple, had departed, and should not return in the same form. Yet Ezekiel in "visions of God" sees a temple reconstructed to receive the glory of the divine presence, a prophetic vision fulfilled in Emmanuel ("God with us"), who tabernacled among men John 1:14. Compare Romans 9:25; Revelation 21:2-3.