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Ezra 4:11

    Ezra 4:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    This is the copy of the letter that they sent unto him, even unto Artaxerxes the king; Thy servants the men on this side the river, and at such a time.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    This is the copy of the letter that they sent to him, even to Artaxerxes the king; Your servants the men on this side the river, and at such a time.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    This is the copy of the letter that they sent unto Artaxerxes the king: Thy servants the men beyond the River, and so forth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    This is a copy of the letter which they sent to Artaxerxes the king: Your servants living across the river send these words:

    Webster's Revision

    This is the copy of the letter that they sent unto Artaxerxes the king: Thy servants the men beyond the River, and so forth.

    World English Bible

    This is the copy of the letter that they sent to Artaxerxes the king: Your servants the men beyond the River, and so forth.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    This is the copy of the letter that they sent unto Artaxerxes the king; Thy servants the men beyond the river, and so forth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Ezra 4:11

    And at such a time - The word וכענת ucheeneth has greatly perplexed all commentators and critics. The versions give us no light; and the Vulgate translates it et dicunt salutem, "and they wish prosperity." Some translate it and so forth; and our translators supposed that it referred to the date, which however is not specified, and might have been as easily entered as the words and at such a time.

    In our first translation of the Bible, that by Coverdale, in 1535, the passage stands thus: "And other on this syde the water, and in Canaan."

    In that by Becke, 1549, it is thus: "And other on this syde the water, and in Ceneeth:" and in the margin he enters "or peace," "or health." In Cardmarden's Bible, printed at Rouen, 1566, it stands thus: "And other that are nowe on thys syde the water." In that printed by Barker, 1615, we find the text thus: "And Other that are beyond the river, and Cheeneth;" on which is the following marginal note: "To wit, Euphrates: and he meaneth in respect of Babel, that they dwelt beyond it." And the note on Cheeneth is, "Which were a certain people that envied the Jews." All this is merely guessing, in the midst of obscurity; most of these having considered the original word כענת Ceeneth as the name of a people; and in this they follow the Syriac, which uses the word Acaneth.

    Calmet thinks we should read ובעת ubaeth, "and at this time;" as if they had said, "We wish thee to enjoy the same health and prosperity at all future times, which thou dost at present." This is not remote from the meaning of the Chaldee original.