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Genesis 10:10

    Genesis 10:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And at the first, his kingdom was Babel and Erech and Accad and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

    Webster's Revision

    And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

    World English Bible

    The beginning of his kingdom was Babel, Erech, Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 10:10

    The beginning of his kingdom was Babel - בבל babel signifies confusion; and it seems to have been a very proper name for the commencement of a kingdom that appears to have been founded in apostasy from God, and to have been supported by tyranny, rapine, and oppression.

    In the land of Shinar - The same as mentioned Genesis 11:2. It appears that, as Babylon was built on the river Euphrates, and the tower of Babel was in the land of Shinar, consequently Shinar itself must have been in the southern part of Mesopotamia.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 10:10

    The beginning or first seat and the extent of his kingdom among men are then described. It consists of four towns - Babel and Erek and Akkad and Kalneh, in the land of Shinar. The number four is characteristic of Nimrod's kingdom. It is the mark of the four quarters of the earth, of universality in point of extent, and therefore of ambition. The site of Babel (Babylon) has been discovered in certain ruins near Hillah, chiefly on the opposite or eastern bank of the Euphrates, where there is a square mound called Babil by the natives. Erek has been traced also on the east bank of the Euphrates, about one hundred miles southeast of Babil, or half way between the city and the confluence of the rivers. It is the Orchoe of the Greeks, and the ruins now bear the name of Urka, or Warka. This name appears as Huruk on the cuneiform inscriptions of the place. Akkad, in the Septuagint. Archad, Col. Taylor finds in Akkerkoof, north of Babel, and about nine miles west of the Tigris, where it approaches the Euphrates. Here there is a hill or mound of ruins called Tel Nimrud. Rawlinson finds the name Akkad frequent in the inscriptions, and mentions Kingi Akkad as part of the kingdom of Urukh, but without identifying the site. Kalneh, Kalno, Isaiah 10:9; Kanneh, Ezekiel 27:23, is regarded by Jerome, and the Targum of Jonathan, as the same with Ktesiphon on the Tigris, in the district of Chalonitis. Its ruins are near Takti Kesra. Rawlinson identifies it with Niffer, but without assigning satisfactory grounds. The sites of these towns fix that of Shinar, which is evidently the lower part of Mesopotamia, or, more precisely, the country west of the Tigris, and south of Is, or Hit, on the Euphrates, and Samara on the Tigris. It is otherwise called Babylonia and Chaldaea.

    Wesley's Notes on Genesis 10:10

    10:10 The beginning of his kingdom was Babel - Some way or other, he got into power: and so laid the foundations of a monarchy which was afterwards a head of gold. It doth not appear that he had any right to rule by birth; but either his fitness for government recommended him, or by power and policy he gradually advanced into the throne. See the antiquity of civil government, and particularly that form of it which lodges the sovereignty in a single person.