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Genesis 10:4

    Genesis 10:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the sons of Javan; Elishah, and Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the sons of Javan; Elishah, and Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the sons of Javan: Elishah, and Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And the sons of Javan: Elishah and Tarshish, the Kittim and the Dodanim.

    Webster's Revision

    And the sons of Javan: Elishah, and Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim.

    World English Bible

    The sons of Javan: Elishah, Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the sons of Javan; Elishah, and Tarshish, Kittim, and Dodanim.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 10:4

    Elishah - As Javan peopled a considerable part of Greece, it is in that region that we must seek for the settlements of his descendants; Elishah probably was the first who settled at Elis, in Peloponnesus.

    Tarshish - He first inhabited Cilicia, whose capital anciently was the city of Tarsus, where the Apostle Paul was born.

    Kittim - We have already seen that this name was rather the name of a people than of an individual: some think by Kittim Cyprus is meant: others, the isle of Chios; and others, the Romans; and others, the Macedonians.

    Dodanim - Or Rodanim, for the ד and ר may be easily mistaken for each other, because of their great similarity. Some suppose that this family settled at Dodona in Epirus; others at the isle of Rhodes; others, at the Rhone, in France, the ancient name of which was Rhodanus, from the Scripture Rodanim.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 10:4

    Javan has four sons, who are the heads of nations.

    (11) Elishah is noted by Ezekiel EZechariah 27:7 as a nation whose maritime country produced purple, which agrees with the coast of Laconia or the Corinthian Gulf. The name has been variously sought in Elis, Hellas, and Aeolis. The last is due to Josephus. It is possible that Elea or Velia, in the south of Italy, may contain some reference to the name.

    (12) Tarshish is conjectured by Josephus to be the people of Cilicia; which, he affirms, was anciently called Tharsus, and the capital of which was Tarsus. But whether this be the primitive seat of Tarshish or not, it is almost certain that Spain retains the name, if not in Tarraco, at least in Tartessus.

    (13) Kittim is discovered, by Josephus, in Cyprus, where we meet with the town of Citium Κίτιον Kition. He adds, however, that all the islands and the greater part of the seacoasts are called Χεδίμ Chedim by the Hebrews. We may therefore presume that the Kittim spread into northern Greece, where we have a Κίτιον Kition in Macedonia, and ultimately into Italy, which is designated as "the isles of Kittim" Numbers 24:24; Isaiah 23:1; Jeremiah 2:10; Ezekiel 27:6; Daniel 11:30.

    (14) Dodanim leaves a trace, perhaps, in Dodona, an ancient site of the Hellenes in Epirus, and perhaps in Dardania, a district of Illyricum.