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Genesis 11:10

    Genesis 11:10 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    These are the generations of Shem: Shem was an hundred years old, and begat Arphaxad two years after the flood:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    These are the generations of Shem: Shem was an hundred years old, and begat Arphaxad two years after the flood:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    These are the generations of Shem. Shem was a hundred years old, and begat Arpachshad two years after the flood.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    These are the generations of Shem. Shem was a hundred years old when he became the father of Arpachshad, two years after the great flow of waters;

    Webster's Revision

    These are the generations of Shem. Shem was a hundred years old, and begat Arpachshad two years after the flood.

    World English Bible

    This is the history of the generations of Shem. Shem was one hundred years old and became the father of Arpachshad two years after the flood.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    These are the generations of Shem. Shem was an hundred years old, and begat Arpachshad two years after the flood:

    Definitions for Genesis 11:10

    Begat - To bear; to bring forth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 11:10

    These are the generations of Shem - This may he called the holy family, as from it sprang Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, the twelve patriarchs, David, Solomon, and all the great progenitors of the Messiah.

    We have already seen that the Scripture chronology, as it exists in the Hebrew text, the Samaritan, the Septuagint, Josephus, and some of the fathers, is greatly embarrassed; and it is yet much more so in the various systems of learned and unlearned chronologists. For a full and rational view of this subject, into which the nature of these notes forbids me farther to enter, I must refer my reader to Dr. Hales's laborious work, "A New Analysis of Sacred Chronology," vol. ii., part 1, etc., in which he enters into the subject with a cautious but firm step; and, if he has not been able to remove all its difficulties, has thrown very considerable light upon most parts of it.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 11:10

    - Section IX - The Line to Abram

    - XXXV. The Line of Abram

    18. רעוּ re‛û, Re'u, "friend;" verb: "feed, delight in, enjoy."

    20. שׂרוּג śerûg, Serug, "vine-shoot."

    22. נחור nāchôr, Nachor, "snorting."

    24. תרה terach, Terach, "delay?" Aramaic.

    26. אברם 'abrām, Abram, "high father." הרן hārān Haran, "mountaineer."

    The usual phrase, "These are the generations," marks the beginning of the fifth document. Accordingly, we now enter upon a new phase of human development. The nations have gradually departed from the living God. They have not, however, stopped at this negative stage of ungodliness. They have fallen into polytheism and idolatry. And the knowledge of the one true God, the Maker, Possessor, and Upholder of heaven and earth, is on the verge of being entirely lost. Nevertheless the promises, first to the race of Adam, that the seed of the woman should bruise the serpent's head, and next to the family of Noah, that the Lord should be the God of Shem, were still in force. It is obvious, from the latter promise, that the seed of the woman is to be expected in the line of Shem.

    The present passage contains the pedigree of Abram from Shem. From this it appears that the sacred writer here reverts to the second year after the flood - a point of time long before the close of the preceding narrative. "Shem was the son of a hundred years," or in his hundredth year, two years after the flood, and therefore in the six hundred and third year of Noah, and consequently three years after Japheth. Abram was the twentieth, inclusive, from Adam, the tenth from Shem, and the seventh from Heber. A second Kenan is inserted after Arpakshad in the Septuagint, and in the Gospel according to Luke. But this name does not occur even in the Septuagint in 1 Chronicles 1:24, where the genealogy of Abram is given. It is not found in the Samaritan Pentateuch, the Targums, or the ancient versions. It does not appear in Josephus or Philo. Neither is it found in the Codex Bezae in the Gospel of Luke. It must therefore be regarded as an interpolation.

    The following table is a continuation of that given at the fifth chapter, and will serve for the comparison of the different forms in which the numbers are presented:

    Line of Abram Hebrew Sam. Pent. Septuagint Josephus Date Son's Birth OwnDeath Son's Birth OwnDeath Son's Birth OwnDeath Son's Birth OwnDeath OfBirth OfDeath 11. Shem (97) 2 600 (97) 2 600 (97) 2 600 (97) 12 1559 2150 12. Arpakshad (Καινᾶν) 35 438 135 438 135 535 135 1658 2096 13. Shelah 30 433 130 433 130 460 130 1693 2126 14. Heber 34 464 134 404 134 404 134 1723 2187 15. Peleg 30 239 130 239 130 339 130 1757 1996 16. Reu 32 239 132 239 132 339 130 1787 2096 17. Serug 30 230 130 230 130 330 132 1819 2049 18. Nahor 29 148 79 148 175 304 120 1849 1997 19. Terah

    (Haran) 70

    60 205 70

    60 145 70

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