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Genesis 18:1

    Genesis 18:1 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the LORD appeared unto him in the plains of Mamre: and he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the LORD appeared to him in the plains of Mamre: and he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Jehovah appeared unto him by the oaks of Mamre, as he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Now the Lord came to him by the holy tree of Mamre, when he was seated in the doorway of his tent in the middle of the day;

    Webster's Revision

    And Jehovah appeared unto him by the oaks of Mamre, as he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day;

    World English Bible

    Yahweh appeared to him by the oaks of Mamre, as he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the LORD appeared unto him by the oaks of Mamre, as he sat in the tent door in the heat of the day;

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 18:1

    And the Lord appeared - See note on Genesis 15:1.

    Sat in the tent door - For the purpose of enjoying the refreshing air in the heat of the day, when the sun had most power. A custom still frequent among the Asiatics.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 18:1

    The Lord visits Abraham and assures Sarah of the birth of a son. Abraham is sitting in the tent door in the heat of the day, reposing. "Three men stood before him." Whenever visitants from the celestial world appear to men, they have the form of man. This is the only form of a rational being known to us. It is not the design of God in revealing his mercy to us to make us acquainted with the whole of the nature of things. The science of things visible or invisible he leaves to our natural faculties to explore, as far as occasion allows. Hence, we conclude that the celestial visitant is a real being, and that the form is a real form. But we are not entitled to infer that the human is the only or the proper form of such beings, or that they have any ordinary or constant form open to sense. We only discern that they are intelligent beings like ourselves, and, in order to manifest themselves to us as such, put on that form of intelligent creatures with which we are familiar, and in which they can intelligibly confer with us. For the same reason they speak the language of the party addressed, though, for ought we know, spiritual beings use none of the many languages of humanity, and have quite a different mode of communicating with one another. Other human acts follow on the occasion. They accept the hospitality of Abraham and partake of human food. This, also, was a real act. It does not imply, however, that food is necessary to spiritual beings. The whole is a typical act representing communion between God and Abraham. The giving and receiving of a meal was the ground of a perpetual or inviolable friendship.

    He ran to meet him. - This indicates the genuine warmth of unsophisticated nature. "Bowed himself to the earth." This indicates a low bow, in which the body becomes horizontal, and the head droops. This gesture is employed both in worship and doing obeisance.

    Wesley's Notes on Genesis 18:1

    18:1 This appearance of God to Abraham seems to have had in it more of freedom and familiarity, and less of grandeur and majesty, than those we have hitherto read of, and therefore more resembles that great visit which in the fulness of time the Son of God was to make to the world. He sat in the tent - door in the heat of the day - Not so much to repose himself, as to seek an opportunity of doing good, by giving entertainment to strangers.