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Genesis 18:3

    Genesis 18:3 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And said, My LORD, if now I have found favour in thy sight, pass not away, I pray thee, from thy servant:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And said, My LORD, if now I have found favor in your sight, pass not away, I pray you, from your servant:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    and said, My lord, if now I have found favor in thy sight, pass not away, I pray thee, from thy servant:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And said, My Lord, if now I have grace in your eyes, do not go away from your servant:

    Webster's Revision

    and said, My lord, if now I have found favor in thy sight, pass not away, I pray thee, from thy servant:

    World English Bible

    and said, "My lord, if now I have found favor in your sight, please don't go away from your servant.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    and said, My lord, if now I have found favour in thy sight, pass not away, I pray thee, from thy servant:

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 18:3

    And said, My Lord, etc. - The word is אדני Adonai, not יהוה Yehovah, for as yet Abraham did not know the quality of his guests. For an explanation of this word, See note on Genesis 15:8.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 18:3

    O Lord. - Abraham uses the word אדני 'adonāy denoting one having authority, whether divine or not. This the Masorites mark as sacred, and apply the vowel points proper to the word when it signifies God. These men in some way represent God; for "the Lord" on this occasion appeared unto Abraham Genesis 18:1. The number is in this respect notable. Abraham addresses himself first to one person Genesis 18:3, then to more than one Genesis 18:4-5. It is stated that "'they' said, So do Genesis 18:5, 'they' did eat Genesis 18:8, ' they' said unto him, Where is Sarah thy wife" Genesis 18:9. Then the singular number is resumed in the phrase "'and he said'" Genesis 18:10, and at length, "The Lord said unto Abraham" Genesis 18:13, and then, "and he said" Genesis 18:15. Then we are told "'the men' rose up, and Abraham went with them" Genesis 18:16. Then we have "The Lord said" twice Genesis 18:17, Genesis 18:20. And lastly, it is said Genesis 18:22 "'the men' turned their faces and went toward Sodom, and Abraham was yet standing before the Lord." From this it appears that of the three men one, at all events, was the Lord, who, when the other two went toward Sodom, remained with Abraham while he made his intercession for Sodom, and afterward he also went his way. The other two will come before us again in the next chapter. Meanwhile, we have here the first explicit instance of the Lord appearing as man to man, and holding familiar conversation with him.

    The narrative affords a pleasing instance of the primitive manners of the East. The hospitality of the pastoral tribes was spontaneous and unreserved. The washing of the feet, which were partly at least uncovered in walking, the reclining under the tree, and the offer of refreshment, are indicative of an unchanging rural simplicity. The phrases "a little water, a morsel of bread," flow from a thoughtful courtesy. "Therefore are ye come." In the course of events it has so fallen out, in order that you might be refreshed. The brief reply is a frank and unaffected acceptance of the hospitable invitation.