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Genesis 20:8

    Genesis 20:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Therefore Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ears: and the men were sore afraid.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Therefore Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ears: and the men were sore afraid.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ear. And the men were sore afraid.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    So Abimelech got up early in the morning and sent for all his servants and gave them word of these things, and they were full of fear.

    Webster's Revision

    And Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ear. And the men were sore afraid.

    World English Bible

    Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ear. The men were very scared.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Abimelech rose early in the morning, and called all his servants, and told all these things in their ears: and the men were sore afraid.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 20:8

    Abimelech rose early, etc. - God came to Abimelech in a dream by night, and we find as the day broke he arose, assembled his servants, (what we would call his courtiers), and communicated to them what he had received from God. They were all struck with astonishment, and discerned the hand of God in this business. Abraham is then called, and in a most respectful and pious manner the king expostulates with him for bringing him and his people under the Divine displeasure, by withholding from him the information that Sarah was his wife; when, by taking her, he sought only an honorable alliance with his family.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 20:8

    Abimelek retraces his steps, and rectifies his conduct. He makes known his dream to his assembled court, who are filled with astonishment and apprehension. He then calls Abraham, and in bold and manly style remonstrates with him for leading him into error and sin. Abraham is apparently silent from confusion and self-condemnation. Abimelek, after a pause, demands of him his reason for so doing. Abraham now replies with great simplicity and candor. He had said within himself, "The fear of God is not in this place." This is another indication that polytheism was setting in. He concluded that his life would be in danger on account of his wife, and resorted to his wonted expedient for safety. He had learned to trust in the Lord in all things; but he did not think this inconsistent with using all lawful means for personal security, and he was not yet fully alive to the unlawfulness of his usual pretence. He pleads also in extenuation that she is in reality his sister (see Genesis 12:19-20). "Caused me to wander." The verb here is not necessarily plural. But if it be, it is only an instance of the literal, meaning of אלהים 'ĕlohı̂ym, the Eternal Supernatural Powers, coming into view. "Thy kindness." The old compact of Abraham with Sarah tended to palliate his conduct in the eyes of Abimelek, as he would see that it had no special reference to himself.