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Genesis 22:11

    Genesis 22:11 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the angel of the LORD called unto him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham: and he said, Here am I.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the angel of the LORD called to him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham: and he said, Here am I.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the angel of Jehovah called unto him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham. And he said, Here I am.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    But the voice of the angel of the Lord came from heaven, saying, Abraham, Abraham: and he said, Here am I.

    Webster's Revision

    And the angel of Jehovah called unto him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham. And he said, Here I am.

    World English Bible

    The angel of Yahweh called to him out of the sky, and said, "Abraham, Abraham!" He said, "Here I am."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the angel of the LORD called unto him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham: and he said, Here am I.

    Definitions for Genesis 22:11

    Angel - Messenger.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 22:11

    The angel of the Lord - The very person who was represented by this offering; the Lord Jesus, who calls himself Jehovah, Genesis 22:16, and on his own authority renews the promises of the covenant. He was ever the great Mediator between God and man. See this point proved, Genesis 15:7 (note).

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 22:11

    At this critical moment the angel of the Lord interposes to prevent the actual sacrifice. "Lay not thy hand upon the lad." Here we have the evidence of a voice from heaven that God does not accept of human victims. Man is morally unclean, and therefore unfit for a sacrifice. He is, moreover, not in any sense a victim, but a doomed culprit, for whom the victim has to be provided. And for a typical sacrifice that cannot take away, but only shadow forth, the efficacious sacrifice, man is neither fit nor necessary. The lamb without blemish, that has no penal or protracted suffering, is sufficient for a symbol of the real atonement. The intention, therefore, in this case was enough, and that was now seen to be real. "Now I know that thou fearest God." This was known to God antecedent to the event that demonstrated it. But the original "I have known" denotes an eventual knowing, a discovering by actual experiment; and this observable probation of Abraham was necessary for the judicial eye of God, who is to govern the world, and for the conscience of man, who is to be instructed by practice as well as principle. "Thou hast not withheld thy son from me." This voluntary surrender of all that was dear to him, of all that he could in any sense call his own, forms the keystone of Abraham's spiritual experience. He is henceforth a tried man.

    Wesley's Notes on Genesis 22:11

    22:11 The Angel of the Lord - That is, God himself, the eternal Word, the Angel of the covenant, who was to be the great Redeemer and Comforter.