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Genesis 22:4

    Genesis 22:4 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then on the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place afar off.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then on the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place afar off.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    On the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place afar off.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And on the third day, Abraham, lifting up his eyes, saw the place a long way off.

    Webster's Revision

    On the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place afar off.

    World English Bible

    On the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place far off.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    On the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes, and saw the place afar off.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 22:4

    The third day - "As the number Seven," says Mr. Ainsworth, "is of especial use in Scripture because of the Sabbath day, Genesis 2:2, so Three is a mystical number because of Christ's rising from the dead the third day, Matthew 17:23; 1 Corinthians 15:4; as he was crucified the third hour after noon, Mark 15:25 : and Isaac, as he was a figure of Christ, in being the only son of his father, and not spared but offered for a sacrifice, Romans 8:32, so in sundry particulars he resembled our Lord: the third day Isaac was to be offered up, so it was the third day in which Christ also was to be perfected, Luke 13:32; Isaac carried the wood for the burnt-offering, Genesis 22:6, so Christ carried the tree whereon he died, John 19:17; the binding of Isaac, Genesis 21:9, was also typical, so Christ was bound, Matthew 27:2.

    "In the following remarkable cases this number also occurs. Moses desired to go three days' journey in the wilderness to sacrifice, Exodus 5:3; and they traveled three days in it before they found water, Exodus 15:22; and three days' journey the ark of the covenant went before them, to search out a resting place, Numbers 10:33; by the third day the people were to be ready to receive God's law, Exodus 19:11; and after three days to pass over Jordan into Canaan, Joshua 1:14; the third day Esther put on the apparel of the kingdom, Esther 5:1; on the third day Hezekiah, being recovered from his illness, went up to the house of the Lord, 2 Kings 20:5; on the third day, the prophet said, God will raise us up and we shall live before him, Hosea 6:2; and on the third day, as well as on the seventh, the unclean person was to purify himself, Numbers 19:12 : with many other memorable things which the Scripture speaks concerning the third day, and not without mystery. See Genesis 40:12, Genesis 40:13; Genesis 42:17, Genesis 42:18; Jonah 1:17; Joshua 2:16; unto which we may add a Jew's testimony in Bereshith Rabba, in a comment on this place: There are many Three Days mentioned in the Holy Scripture, of which one is the resurrection of the Messiah." - Ainsworth.

    Saw the place afar off - He knew the place by seeing the cloud of glory smoking on the top of the mountain - Targum.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 22:4

    The story is now told with exquisite simplicity. "On the third day." From Beer-sheba to the Shalem of Melkizedec, near which this hill is supposed to have been, is about forty-five miles. If they proceeded fifteen miles on the first broken day, twenty on the second, and ten on the third, they would come within sight of the place early on the third day. "Lifted up his eyes." It is scarcely necessary to remind the reader of the Bible that this phrase does not imply that the place was above his point of view. Lot lifted up his eyes and beheld all the vale of Jordan Genesis 13:10, which was considerably below the position of the observer. "And return unto you." The intimation that he and the lad would return, may seem to have rested on a dim presentiment that God would restore Isaac to him even if sacrificed. But it is more in keeping with the earnestness of the whole transaction to regard it as a mere concealment of his purpose from his servants. "And he bound Isaac his son." There is a wonderful pathos in the words his son, his father, introduced in the sacred style in this and similar narratives. Isaac, when the trying moment came, seems to have made no resistance to his father's will. The binding was merely a sacrificial custom. He must have concluded that his father was in all this obeying the will of God, though he gave him only a distant hint that it was so. Abraham is thoroughly in earnest in the whole procedure.