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Genesis 29:21

    Genesis 29:21 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Jacob said unto Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in unto her.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Jacob said to Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in to her.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Jacob said unto Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in unto her.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then Jacob said to Laban, Give me my wife so that I may have her, for the days are ended.

    Webster's Revision

    And Jacob said unto Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in unto her.

    World English Bible

    Jacob said to Laban, "Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in to her."

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Jacob said unto Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in unto her.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 29:21

    My days are fulfilled - My seven years are now completed, let me have my wife, for whom I have given this service as a dowry.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 29:21

    Jacob is betrayed into marrying Leah, and on consenting to serve other seven years obtains Rachel also. He claims his expected reward when due. "Made a feast." The feast in the house of the bride's father seems to have lasted seven days, at the close of which the marriage was completed. But the custom seems to have varied according to the circumstances of the bridegroom. Jacob had no house of his own to which to conduct the bride. In the evening: when it was dark. The bride was also closely veiled, so that it was easy for Laban to practise this piece of deceit. "A handmaid." It was customary to give the bride a handmaid, who became her confidential servant Genesis 24:59, Genesis 24:61. In the morning Jacob discovers that Laban had overreached him. This is the first retribution Jacob experiences for the deceitful practices of his former days. He expostulates with Laban, who pleads the custom of the country.

    It is still the custom not to give the younger in marriage before the older, unless the latter be deformed or in some way defective. It is also not unusual to practise the very same trick that Laban now employed, if the suitor is so simple as to be off his guard. Jacob, however, did not expect this at his relative's hands, though he had himself taken part in proceedings equally questionable. "Fulfill the week of this." If this was the second day of the feast celebrating the nuptials of Leah, Laban requests him to Complete the week, and then he will give him Rachel also. If, however, Leah was fraudulently put upon him at the close of the week of feasting, then Laban in these words proposes to give Rachel to Jacob on fulfilling another week of nuptial rejoicing. The latter is in the present instance more likely. In either case the marriage of Rachel is only a week after that of Leah. Rather than lose Rachel altogether, Jacob consents to comply with Laban's terms.

    Rachel was the wife of Jacob's affections and intentions. The taking of a second wife in the lifetime of the first was contrary to the law of nature, which designed one man for one woman Genesis 2:21-25. But the marrying of a sister-in-law was not yet incestuous, because no law had yet been made on the subject. Laban gives a handmaid to each of his daughters. To Rebekah his sister had been given more than one Genesis 24:61. Bondslaves had been in existence long before Laban's time Genesis 16:1. "And loved also Rachel more than Leah." This proves that even Leah was not unloved. At the time of his marriage Jacob was eighty-four years of age; which corresponds to half that age according to the present average of human life.