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Genesis 29:9

    Genesis 29:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And while he yet spake with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep: for she kept them.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And while he yet spoke with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep; for she kept them.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    While he was yet speaking with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep. For she kept them.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    While he was still talking with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep, for she took care of them.

    Webster's Revision

    While he was yet speaking with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep. For she kept them.

    World English Bible

    While he was yet speaking with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep, for she kept them.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    While he yet spake with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep; for she kept them.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 29:9

    Rachel came with her father's sheep - So we find that young women were not kept concealed in the house till the time they were married, which is the common gloss put on עלמה almah, a virgin, one concealed. Nor was it beneath the dignity of the daughters of the most opulent chiefs to carry water from the well, as in the case of Rebekah; or tend sheep, as in the case of Rachel. The chief property in those times consisted in flocks: and who so proper to take care of them as those who were interested in their safety and increase? Honest labor, far from being a discredit, is an honor both to high and low. The king himself is served by the field; and without it, and the labor necessary for its cultivation, all ranks must perish. Let every son, let every daughter, learn that it is no discredit to be employed, whenever it may be necessary, in the meanest offices, by which the interests of the family may be honestly promoted.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 29:9

    Jacob's interview with Rachel, and hospitable reception by Laban. Rachel's approach awakens all Jacob's warmth of feeling. He rolls away the stone, waters the sheep, kisses Rachel, and bursts into tears. The remembrance of home and of the relationship of his mother to Rachel overpowers him. He informs Rachel who he is, and she runs to acquaint her father. Laban hastens to welcome his relative to his house. "Surely my bone and my flesh art thou." This is a description of kinsmanship probably derived from the formation of the woman out of the man Genesis 2:23. A month here means the period from new moon to new moon, and consists of twenty-nine or thirty days.