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Genesis 35:8

    Genesis 35:8 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    But Deborah Rebekah's nurse died, and she was buried beneath Bethel under an oak: and the name of it was called Allonbachuth.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    But Deborah Rebekah's nurse died, and she was buried beneath Bethel under an oak: and the name of it was called Allonbachuth.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Deborah Rebekah's nurse died, and she was buried below Beth-el under the oak: and the name of it was called Allon-bacuth.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Deborah, the servant who had taken care of Rebekah from her birth, came to her end, and was put to rest near Beth-el, under the holy tree: and they gave it the name of Allon-bacuth.

    Webster's Revision

    And Deborah Rebekah's nurse died, and she was buried below Beth-el under the oak: and the name of it was called Allon-bacuth.

    World English Bible

    Deborah, Rebekah's nurse, died, and she was buried below Bethel under the oak; and its name was called Allon Bacuth.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Deborah Rebekah's nurse died, and she was buried below Beth-el under the oak: and the name of it was called Allon-bacuth.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 35:8

    But Deborah, Rebekah's nurse, died - She was sent with Rebekah when taken by Abraham's servant to be wife to Isaac, Genesis 24:59. How she came to be in Jacob's family, expositors are greatly puzzled to find out; but the text does not state that she was in Jacob's family. Her death is mentioned merely because Jacob and his family had now arrived at the place where she was buried, and the name of that place was called Allon-bachuth, "the oak of weeping," as it is likely her death had been greatly regretted, and a general and extraordinary mourning had taken place on the occasion. Of Rebekah's death we know nothing. After her counsel to her son, Genesis 27:5-17, Genesis 27:42-46, we hear no more of her history from the sacred writings, except of her burial in Genesis 49:31. Her name is written in the dust. And is not this designed as a mark of the disapprobation of God? It seems strange that such an inconsiderable person as a nurse should be mentioned, when even the person she brought up is passed by unnoticed! It has been observed that the nurse of Aeneas is mentioned nearly in the same way by the poet Virgil; and in the circumstances, in both cases, there is a striking resemblance.

    "Tu quoque littoribus nostris,

    Aeneia nutrix, Aeternam moriens famam,

    Caleta, dedisti:

    Eet nunc servat honos sedem tunus; ossaque nomen,

    Hesperia in magna, (si qua est en gloria), signat.

    At pius exequils Aeneas rite solutis,

    Aggere composito tumuli, postquam alta quierunt

    Aequora, tendit iter veils, portumque relinqult."

    Aen., lib. vii., ver. 1, etc.

    "Thou too, Cajeta, whose indulgent cares

    Nursed the great chief, and form'd his tender years,

    Expiring here (an ever-honor'd name!)

    Adorn Hesperia with immortal fame:

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