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Genesis 4:13

    Genesis 4:13 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And Cain said unto the LORD, My punishment is greater than I can bear.

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And Cain said to the LORD, My punishment is greater than I can bear.

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And Cain said unto Jehovah, My punishment is greater than I can bear.

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    And Cain said, My punishment is greater than my strength.

    Webster's Revision

    And Cain said unto Jehovah, My punishment is greater than I can bear.

    World English Bible

    Cain said to Yahweh, "My punishment is greater than I can bear.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And Cain said unto the LORD, My punishment is greater than I can bear.

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 4:13

    My punishment is greater than I can bear - The margin reads, Mine iniquity is greater than that it may be forgiven. The original words, גדול עוני מנשוא gadol avoni minneso, may be translated, Is my crime too great to be forgiven? words which we may presume he uttered on the verge of black despair. It is most probable that עון avon signifies rather the crime than the punishment; in this sense it is used Leviticus 26:41, Leviticus 26:43 1 Samuel 28:10; 2 Kings 7:9; and נשא nasa signifies to remit or forgive. The marginal reading is, therefore, to be preferred to that in the text.

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 4:13

    My iniquity is more than I can bear. - To bear iniquity is in Hebrew phrase to undergo the punishment of it. And the prospect of this, as it presents itself to the eyes of Cain, is so appalling that he shrinks from it as intolerable. To be driven from the face of the soil, inhabited by the other surviving members of the human family, to an unknown and therefore terrible region; to be hidden from the face of God, who manifested himself still to the race of Adam in their present abode; to be a vagabond and a fugitive in the earth, far away from the land of his birth; and to be liable to be slain in just revenge by anyone who should find him - such is the hard fate he sees before him. It is dark enough in itself, and no doubt darker still in the exaggeration which an accusing conscience conjures up to his imagination. The phrase, "every one finding me," implies that the family of Adam had now become numerous. Not only sons and daughters, but their children and grandchildren may have been growing up when Cain was sent into exile. But in his present terror even an excited fancy suggested an enemy at every turn.