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Genesis 40:9

    Genesis 40:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    And the chief butler told his dream to Joseph, and said to him, In my dream, behold, a vine was before me;

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    And the chief butler told his dream to Joseph, and said to him, In my dream, behold, a vine was before me;

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    And the chief butler told his dream to Joseph, and said to him, In my dream, behold, a vine was before me;

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then the chief wine-servant gave Joseph an account of his dream, and said, In my dream I saw a vine before me;

    Webster's Revision

    And the chief butler told his dream to Joseph, and said to him, In my dream, behold, a vine was before me;

    World English Bible

    The chief cupbearer told his dream to Joseph, and said to him, "In my dream, behold, a vine was in front of me,

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    And the chief butler told his dream to Joseph, and said to him, In my dream, behold, a vine was before me;

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 40:9

    The chief butler now recites his dream. "Pressed them into Pharaoh's cup." The imagery of the dream is not intended to intimate that Pharaoh drank only the fresh juice of the grape. It only expresses by a natural figure the source of wine, and possibly the duty of the chief butler to understand and superintend the whole process of its formation. Egypt was not only a corn, but a vine country. The interpretation of this dream was very obvious and natural; yet not without a divine intimation could it be known that the "three branches were three days." Joseph, in the quiet confidence that his interpretation would prove correct, begs the chief butler to remember him and endeavor to procure his release. "Stolen, stolen was I." He assures him that he was not a criminal, and that his enslavement was an act of wrongful violence - a robbery by the strong hand. "From the land of the Hebrews;" a very remarkable expression, as it strongly favors the presumption that the Hebrews inhabited the country before Kenaan took possession of it. "I have not done aught." Joseph pleads innocence, and claims liberation, not as an unmerited favor, but as a right. "The pit." The pit without water seems to have been the primitive place of confinement for culprits.