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Genesis 41:9

    Genesis 41:9 Translations

    King James Version (KJV)

    Then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:

    American King James Version (AKJV)

    Then spoke the chief butler to Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:

    American Standard Version (ASV)

    Then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:

    Basic English Translation (BBE)

    Then the chief wine-servant said to Pharaoh, The memory of my sin comes back to me now;

    Webster's Revision

    Then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:

    World English Bible

    Then the chief cupbearer spoke to Pharaoh, saying, "I remember my faults today.

    English Revised Version (ERV)

    Then spake the chief butler unto Pharaoh, saying, I do remember my faults this day:

    Clarke's Commentary on Genesis 41:9

    I do remember my faults - It is not possible he could have forgotten the circumstance to which he here alludes; it was too intimately connected with all that was dear to him, to permit him ever to forget it. But it was not convenient for him to remember this before; and probably he would not have remembered it now, had he not seen, that giving this information in such a case was likely to serve his own interest. We are justified in thinking evil of this man because of his scandalous neglect of a person who foretold the rescue of his life from imminent destruction, and who, being unjustly confined, prayed to have his case fairly represented to the king that justice might be done him; but this courtier, though then in the same circumstances himself, found it convenient to forget the poor, friendless Hebrew slave!

    Barnes' Notes on Genesis 41:9

    The chief butler now calls Joseph to mind, and mentions his gift to Pharaoh. "My sins." His offence against Pharaoh. His ingratitude in forgetting Joseph for two years does not perhaps occur to him as a sin. "A Hebrew lad." The Egyptians were evidently well acquainted with the Hebrew race, at a time when Israel had only a family. "Him he hanged." The phrase is worthy of note, as a specimen of pithy brevioquence. Him he declared that the dream foreboded that Pharaoh would hang.